US Elections 2020: Here's how you can track the status of your mail-in ballot, check if it got rejected and fix it

Most states, with the help of USPS, mailed the ballot envelopes with Intelligent Mail Barcodes


                            US Elections 2020: Here's how you can track the status of your mail-in ballot, check if it got rejected and fix it
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The presidential race between President Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden remains on an edge as election operators in the key states continue to mail-in ballots votes. Most states, with the help of USPS, mailed the ballot envelopes with a unique assortment of numbers for each individual voter. These numbers are usually known as Intelligent Mail Barcodes, which enable the Postal Service to track the ballot. It's still too early to call a winner in these six states as votes continue to be calculated in various key states.

Key States Election Tracker

Alaska: Track your ballot here.

Arizona: Track your ballot here.

Georgia: Track your ballot here.

Nevada: Track your ballot here.

North Carolina: Track your ballot here.

Pennsylvania: Track your ballot here.

Learn how you can check your ballot in other states here.

And if ballot tracking technology isn't available where you live, you can contact your local election office if you have questions or concerns about your ballot.

Check if your ballot was rejected — and possibly fix it if it was

While tracking your ballot via links given above, you discover that your bllot has been rejected, check your state election page for options, if you can't find the information there, contact your local election executives. It might happen that the number goes busy or if the executive is busy, you may have to wait or try a few times. Do this as soon as possible, since states typically offer a limited window to correct signatures. As in many states, executives give voters opportunities to correct, or “cure,” their ballots, usually for mismatched or missing signatures.

But not all ballots can be corrected, as ballots that come past the deadline, for example, will be rejected. But at least 18 states require election executives to contact voters if there’s an issue with their ballot and give them a chance to correct or cure it, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Other states have affirmed new procedures to cure ballots starting with this election.

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