United Airlines slammed for criticizing Georgia voting law, MAGA mob dubs company 'pandering hypocrites'

'Why don't you stick to poorly flying people on planes instead of poorly wading into election politics and voter ID laws,' a user commented


                            United Airlines slammed for criticizing Georgia voting law, MAGA mob  dubs company 'pandering hypocrites'
United Airlines (Linkedin)
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United Airlines on Monday, April 5, made a statement on Twitter calling legislation that encroaches on the right to vote "wrong", joining in the corporate backlash that has erupted in the wake of Georgia’s new voting law. The airline didn’t mention Georgia or reference the state's law specifically in its statement but called voting a “vital civic duty.”

“Some have questioned the integrity of the nation’s election systems and are using it to justify stricter voting procedures, even though numerous studies have found zero credible evidence of widespread fraud in U.S. elections,” the company’s statement said. “Legislation that infringes on the right to vote of fellow Americans is wrong. We believe that leaders in both parties should work to protect the rights of eligible voters by making it easier and more convenient for them to cast a ballot and have it counted,” it added.

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Texas, Florida and Arizona are other Republican-led states contemplating similar legislation to Georgia’s. Airlines based in Texas have been calling out the proposed legislation there, which if it makes its way through the legislature and is signed by Gov. Greg Abbott (R) would limit early voting hours and increase the authority of partisan poll watchers.

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The recently-enacted law expands early voting on weekends, puts new limitations on voting by mail and adds voter ID requirements. Outside groups are also forbidden from handing out food and water to people waiting to cast their ballot.

As soon as the United Airlines statement came to light, people started either slamming the company or mocking those canceling the airline company. One Internet user said, "Your mission should NEVER be to oppose free and fair elections. Ever. What a vile and disgusting thing for you to do. It should be to fly me safely. Get back on mission and away from interfering with free and fair elections. Signed, Premier Gold member." Another one said, "GOP is about to cancel United Airlines. This will be interesting."

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Another one said, "If United Airlines didn't like the outcome of your choice of airlines to fly, could they cancel that choice and then decide what airline you will fly?" Rep. Dan Crenshaw,  told United Airlines to just "shut up" saying, "“Travelers 18 years of age or older are required to have a valid, current U.S. federal or state-issued photo ID that contains name, date of birth, gender, expiration date and a tamper-resistant feature for travel..” That’s your policy, United. Pandering hypocrites. Just shut up."

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Calling the airlines "hypocrites" another one said, "Why don't you stick to poorly flying people on planes instead of poorly wading into election politics and voter ID laws. After all, United Airlines requires an ID to fly on it's planes-don't you? So isn't that racist, you hypocrites!!!" While another one slammed them saying, "Fools. The bill expands election access. It’s just they ask for ID to make sure people don’t cheat. Did you read the bill? I guess United Airlines is racist for asking me for ID? Woke losers."

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United Airlines is the latest major airline to denounce the Peach State’s new voting law, joining their competitor Delta Airlines in attacking the law. Delta Airlines came under fire after their CEO Ed Bastian spoke out against the law, claiming it was "based on a lie." Arkansas Senator Tom Cotton, R, revealed that Delta had previously praised the new voting law, bringing receipts in the form of a previous statement.

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