Two officers injured as car rams into Theresa May's convoy in Belgium

Theresa May and Charles Michel, prime minister of Belgium, were in a car ahead of where the crash occurred and managed to escape the unfortunate incident unhurt


                            Two officers injured as car rams into Theresa May's convoy in Belgium

British Prime Minister Theresa May was reportedly involved in a car crash after a vehicle struck her convoy in Belgium as she was visiting war graves ahead of Armistice Day. The victims were said to be two police officers on motorcycles who were knocked over by the vehicle. Both the officers were immediately rushed to the hospital. The officers were acting as outriders for May's convoy as she was traveling with Charles Michel, Prime Minister of Belgium.

The Daily Star reported that May's car was ahead of where the crash occurred and she managed to escape the unfortunate incident because of this. The incident has since been described as an "accident". The two country heads were on their way to meet French president Emmanuel Macron just across the border in Albert, France when the incident took place.

Prime Minister Theresa May (R) as Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel looks on lays a wreath at the graves of John Parr, the first British soldier to be killed in 1914, and George Ellison, the last to be killed before Armistice at the St Symphorien Military Cemetery on November 9, 2018 in Mons, Belgium (Source: Gareth Fuller - WPA Pool/Getty Images)
Prime Minister Theresa May (R) as Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel looks on lays a wreath at the graves of John Parr, the first British soldier to be killed in 1914, and George Ellison, the last to be killed before Armistice at the St Symphorien Military Cemetery on November 9, 2018 in Mons, Belgium (Source: Gareth Fuller - WPA Pool/Getty Images)

The incident came at a time when leaders in Europe were preparing to remember the dead from the WWI on November 11, which is Armistice Day. This year is considered special because it has been 100 years since the end of the world.

May was in Belgium to mark the end of the war, which lasted from 1914 to 1918. She traveled later on for other ceremonies in France. Michel was seen climbing out of his vehicle and kneeling on the road to see if one of the injured officers was alright. 

A message is left on the wreath left by Prime Minister Theresa May at the grave of George Ellison (Source: Gareth Fuller - WPA Pool/Getty Images)
A message is left on the wreath left by Prime Minister Theresa May at the grave of George Ellison (Source: Gareth Fuller - WPA Pool/Getty Images)

May quoted poetry from WWI when she thanked the fallen soldiers for being "staunch to the end against odds uncounted" as she was paying her respects to mark the 100 years of Armistice. The leaders had a private meeting as well as a working lunch before they all left for the wreath-laying ceremony at the Thiepval Memorial nearby. The site has the names of more than 72,000 members of armed forces who died in the battle.

The wreath consisted of a combination of poppies and le bleuet, which are the two emblems of remembrance in Britain and France, was made just for the occasion. May said that the visit was a good opportunity to talk about the days that the countries fought together in Europe but also looking ahead to a "shared future, built on peace, prosperity, and friendship".

A message is left on the wreath left by Prime Minister Theresa May at the grave of John Parr (Source: Gareth Fuller - WPA Pool/Getty Images)
A message is left on the wreath left by Prime Minister Theresa May at the grave of John Parr (Source: Gareth Fuller - WPA Pool/Getty Images)

The British PM put down a wreath at Private Ellison's in a Downing Street card that was attached to the poppies. The note said: "They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted... We will remember them." May's note for Private Parr was a quote from the wartime poem The Soldier written by Rupert Brooke. It said: "There is in that rich earth a richer dust concealed."

The sonnet was written by Brooke, who was an officer in the Royal Navy, while he was on leave for Christmas. It formed a part of a collection of work that was entitled 1914 which published in January 1915.