'The Little Drummer Girl' episode 2: The prisoners' stories are compiled to create a convincing script

While both prisoners try to deceive the agents with their own versions of the story, they fail to acknowledge the fact that they are after all the pawns in this show.


                            'The Little Drummer Girl' episode 2: The prisoners' stories are compiled to create a convincing script

Charlie has been struck with fear and her trust was already broken when she found out that Becker has been conspiring all along to bring her to Marty, but things are about to get very tough for the young actress. Played by Florence Pugh, in BBC 1's adaptation of John Le Carre's 1983 novel, 'The Little Drummer Girl', Charlie has been an extremely bold and intrigued girl but there are certain things that she would prefer not to speak about, like her incredibly boring life that she is extremely ashamed to talk about. 

In fact, Charlie being the actress that she is can easily convince people that she is actually the daughter of a man who was politically charged as a leftist, and was killed during one such political feud. Unfortunately, Charlie is now with the people who are exactly like her and will not buy any of the stories that she is trying to sell. Yet her incredible skill to convincingly lie, such that she herself begins to believe in it, makes her the perfect candidate for Mossad agents Marty (played by Michael Shannon) and Becker's (played by Alexander Skarsgard) plan to capture a terrorist. 



 

Lured by the charming stranger, whom Charlie lovingly calls Jose, the young actress goes off to Athens during a trip to Greece with her drama troupe. She never expected that her life would soon revolve around a convict whom she had only heard lecturing about left-liberalism in the Arab-Israel conflict, during one of her sessions at the drama class. The second episode throws light upon the fact that the Mossad agents now have two people as their prisoners, one who is clearly the accused of the bombing that took place in the house of an Israeli attaché in West Germany, and the other is the naive yet bold Charlie. 

None of the prisoners know about each other's existence but they are being driven to do things by the same group of individuals who have in a way abducted Charlie. While Marty is least bothered about any of the two prisoners since both are his scapegoats to hunt down the actual beast, Becker begins to show concern for the girl whom he has after all abducted with a couple of lies. As the agents begin to interrogate the two prisoners to align their stories in order to turn it into a convincing script, the prisoners begin to submit to the gang's skillful tactics of luring the prisoners.

Her skill to lie and act has made her the perfect scapegoat. (Twitter)
Her skill to lie and act has made her the perfect scapegoat. (Twitter)

While both prisoners try to deceive the agents with their own versions of the story, they fail to acknowledge the fact that they are after all the pawns in this show. Charlie has been convinced into believing that she is a part of an impromptu act which involves a terrorist and cross-border turmoil, yet she still holds on to her doubts and begins to improvise the script...just like a true actress would, and exactly what Marty had expected out of her. Becker and Marty's script is chiefly written about Khalil's activities, and in this script, it is Becker who embodies the role of Khalil's brother, who has already been captured by Mossad. Everytime Becker narrates parts of the script to her, Charlie jumps up to add her own interesting perspectives to it, such as smoking a cigarette even when her fictional lover, played by Becker, does not want her to. 

However, Charlie who is unaware of the Mossad agents' real identity, tries to outsmart all of them with what she thinks to be a convincing performance. However, she soon realizes that the game is turning into something serious when she has to cross the border all by herself, without any papers. Charlie is thrown into oblivion when she is told that she has to drive the car straight into the borders of Austria, where it is suspected the accused terrorist is hiding. We cannot help but feel helpless when Charlie takes to the wheel and drives, completely in her character, sincerely doing her work as a true artiste. 

Charlie improvises the role the way she wishes to. (Twitter)
Charlie improvises the role the way she wishes to. (Twitter)

The story at this point draws a very fine line of comparison between Charlie and the accused terrorist, who was responsible for the bombing in West Germany. Both of them are under the watchful eye of Mossad, and both of them are unintentionally helping the agents reach their prey before any other bombing takes place. It almost seems like Charlie and the convict, who happens to be the terror-head Khalil's brother, are the two versions of collateral damage that falls upon the common people when there is a war. Earlier when Charlie attended his lecture, it was clear that the two have extremely similar political inclinations. 

Once they are made captives by Mossad, the first thing that they encounter is their political beliefs. Both characters justify their stance in their own way, the only difference being none of them are telling the truth. They have both become a part of this big game for love- one's love is for family, the other for a stranger. None of them are aware of where they are and if their loved ones are looking for them, and it seems like they will not be aware of anything for a very long time. However, the most common factor between the two is that they are both ordinary citizens who have become a part of an extraordinary plot within fractions of a moment. 



 

'The Little Drummer Girl' Episode 2 returns on BBC 1 on Sunday, November 4, at 9 pm. The show directed by Park Chan-wook will come to the US on November 19. 

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