How will 'The L Word: Generation Q' stay relevant at a time when LGBTQI narrative is commonplace?

The original show, despite its popularity, did have its fair share of criticism over the course of its run.


                            How will 'The L Word: Generation Q' stay relevant at a time when LGBTQI narrative is commonplace?
Jennifer Beals, Leisha Hailey, and Katherine Moennig (Source : IMDb)

Two decades ago, 'The L Word' first premiered on Showtime quickly becoming an audience favorite. The show followed an ensemble cast of 30-something friends, mostly lesbians, and their ups and downs in love and life. At the same time, the show explored the complexities of their characters by giving them complete agency: the girls on 'The L Word' did what they liked and did so unapologetically. The glorious five-year run came to an end in 2009 much to the fans' disappointment.

The show created a wave of revolution and Jennifer Beals, Katherine Moennig and Leisha Hailey quickly became household names. The trio is all set to reprise their original roles in the upcoming 'The L Word: Generation Q', a sequel of the show that not only follows the three characters setting out on new journeys but has added a bevy of characters from the LGBTQ+ community from different backgrounds. 

The show, despite its popularity, did have its fair share of criticism over the course of its run. For one, it was criticized for its mighty glamorous portrayal of a small pool of the queer community. Something that the upcoming show has already taken cognizance of and is amending with it very diverse casting of Arienne Mandi as Dani Nùñez, Rosanny Zayas as Sophie Suarez, Leo Sheng as Micah Lee, Jacqueline Toboni as Sarah Finley, Brian Michael Smith as Pierce Williams and Freddy Miyares as Jose Garcia.

Which brings us to the question of the relevance of 'The L Word: Generation Q' at a time when the LGBTQ+ narrative has considerably substantial penetration in our society and the mainstream.

The original concentrated on only lesbian relationships and their close friends. However, actors on the upcoming sequel promise us that the pool has widened to include stories from people of color and transgender people.



 

Since it shut shop though, other shows have taken the conversation around queer relationships forward, in an arguably better way. For instance, 'Queer as Folk', 'Now Apocalypse', and 'Pose' offer a much better, clearer perspective of gender politics than 'The L Word'. But are we really looking at making a comparison along these lines? Even with the plethora of television shows and movies bringing to light the love and life, and trials and tribulations of the LGBTQ+ community, representation must be welcome and appreciated.

At the same time, 'The L Word' doesn't exactly have to prove anything for they had etched their mark in the history of television a long time ago. What they must do now, is no longer hold on to the legacy that once was; what they must work on is amplifying the voices of those that go unheard and misunderstood, offer their platform to those without one. 

'The L Word: Generation Q' will premiere on Sunday, December 8, 2019, on Showtime.

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