Starbucks employees DEBUNK musician Sueco's viral TikTok claim that cup sizes are a 'scam'

Two Starbucks employees debunked musician Sueco's claims that the various cup sizes at Starbucks carried the same quantity of coffee


                            Starbucks employees DEBUNK musician Sueco's viral TikTok claim that cup sizes are a 'scam'
Starbucks employee Jill Elyse (R) posted a duet to the popular Starbucks cup size scam video and demonstrated that the test didn’t exactly hold up (TikTok/@susco and @ jill_elyse)
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Musician Sueco recently became popular on TikTok after accusing Starbucks of defrauding its consumers. The company's various cup sizes carried the same quantity of coffee, according to the musical rapper, who posted a video about the same on Tiktok. “You guys are not going to believe this, Starbucks has been scamming us this whole time,” the TikToker had said in the video. “It fits the same amount of coffee. Look…It’s even a little bit overflowing,” the musician added. However, a new video was posted by two Starbucks employees, who debunked the claims and argued that Sueco's viral video may have been fabricated.

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After disputing another user's assertion that Starbucks was defrauding its customers, a pair of Starbucks employees went viral on TikTok. The video became popular on the video-sharing platform within days. Jill Elyse, a Starbucks employee who is also a TikToker, demonstrated that the test in the rapper's cup size scam video was flawed. Jill and a coworker grabbed the three sizes offered by the coffee shop, tall, grande, and venti, and swapped the liquid between them all. The duo comparison test revealed in a similar same video that the coffee did not overflow as Sueco claimed, leading many in the comments section to suspect that Sueco fabricated the video and exposed him. One user commented, “He never shows inside the cup before the liquid is poured. My guess is he has a piece of styrofoam or something in it.”

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Sueco received a cease-and-desist warning from the coffee business as the prominent figure continued to gather views for his video. He turned to TikTok to share that he had received a letter accusing him of “spreading fake, destructive, and defamatory rumors” about Starbucks. However, a Starbucks spokesperson told Newsweek that the coffee chain did not pursue legal action against Sueco.

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In only a few days, Sueco's video which was posted on June 5, had over 15 million views for demonstrating that coffee poured into their smallest cup size, tall, actually fills the cup of their largest size, venti. Sueco's viral video may have been staged, according to a video recorded by two real Starbucks employees. Although Sueco has yet to comment on whether or not he staged the video, people have deduced that he tampered with the insides of the cups to produce an overflowing look. Watch the viral video here.

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Sueco used the famous social media site to show off a tall cup that can contain 354 ml of liquid, a grande cup that can hold 473 ml, and a venti cup that can store nearly 591 ml. He then proceeded to pour coffee into the various cups, saying that each one holds the same quantity of coffee. The video went viral when it was posted on Sunday, June 5, and had over 16 million views in only four days. Sueco was questioned by TMZ after publishing the Starbucks cup size footage, according to a Sportskeeda source.

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The coffee brand isn't the only establishment to be blamed for the cup size debate. McDonald's was probed for the same reason two years ago. The burger business was allegedly putting the same quantity of drinks into different cup sizes, according to internet users. The rumor, however, was quickly discredited as a hoax. The cups in the popular video were purportedly pre-filled with liquids without the viewer's awareness.

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