Guards, inmates left shocked after prisoner turns up at breakfast with cellmate's ears around his neck!

Prison guards at Columbia Correctional Institution in Lakeside didn't know about the brutal murder until the killer walked into breakfast wearing his victim's ears as a necklace


                            Guards, inmates left shocked after prisoner turns up at breakfast with cellmate's ears around his neck!

A prisoner in Florida jail killed his cellmate, gouged out his eyeballs, chopped off his ears and wrapped the body in a sheet before heading to the mess wearing his ears around his neck. Shockingly, no one at the jail noticed the brutal murder until the killer entered the mess wearing the victim's ears on a necklace. 

The murderer, who remains unnamed, reportedly murdered his cellmate, 58-year-old Larry Mark, and left his body wrapped in a bloodied sheet in the cell on Thursday.

Prison guards at Columbia Correctional Institution in Lakeside had no idea he brutally murdered Mark until he marched into breakfast proudly wearing his victim's ear as a necklace, reports the Miami Herald



 

The killer allegedly became angry at Mark for pestering him and murdered him hours before a gang-related knife fight broke out in another wing of the understaffed prison. The killer had also reportedly told other inmates that he planned to eat Mark's eyeballs. 

Mark was serving a life sentence for murder ordered in 1981. He was just 20 when he and an accomplice hailed a cab and crushed the driver's skull to steal the $35 he was carrying and a wedding ring.  

The killer, on the other hand, had recently transferred to Columbia from Florida State Prison, where he was on death row. 

Prison officials say Columbia houses some of the state's most violent inmates.   

The cellmate murder has brought to light the shortage of corrections officers and limited resources leaving a single guard in charge of up to 250 inmates at a time, according to the New York Post



 

A representative for the Florida Department of Corrections told the Herald that the incident was "intolerable."

"Any loss of life at the hands of an inmate is intolerable, and we are working with our partners at FDLE to investigate this death and ensure anyone responsible is held accountable to the fullest extent of the law," representative Julie Jones said.

"Florida corrections officers have an extremely difficult job, and we ask and expect a lot of them, despite the staffing challenges that exist at our institutions. The nature of this work is inherently dangerous, but I know that our more than 17,000 dedicated officers are committed to our public safety mission and do an outstanding job, day and night, to supervise the 96,000 inmates in our custody," she added.

Disclaimer : This is based on sources and we have been unable to verify this information independently.