Ex-cop who probed OJ Simpson case says Idaho killer could be ID'd from blood spray, saliva and fibers

'A defensive wound or evidence of somebody putting up a fight would be broken nails, scratches, skin under the fingernails,' says Mark Fuhrman

Ex-cop who probed OJ Simpson case says Idaho killer could be ID'd from blood spray, saliva and fibers
Ethan Chapin, Kaylee Goncalves, Xana Kernodle, and Madison Mogen were brutally murdered on Nov. 13 (@xanakernodle/ @kayleegoncalves/Instagram)
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MOSCOW, IDAHO: An ex-LAPD detective, who worked on the infamous OJ Simpson case in 1994, has laid out the forensic insights into the gruesome murder of the four Idaho students. Veteran cop Mark Fuhrman who now lives in Idaho described the blood-soaked crime scene and said investigators have picked out, forensic clues including blood spray, saliva and fibers.

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Authorities also believe there is a connection between the person who killed Kaylee Goncalves, 21, Ethan Chapin, 20, Xana Kernodle, 20, and Madison Mogen, 21 on November 13 and the assailant who is responsible for the disturbing killings of animals nearby, including a pet dog that was skinned and 'filleted,' three miles from the deceased Idaho students crime scene. Although the police are vigilantly trying to follow-up on the stalker of Kaylee they have had no success, considering how most of the students have gone home due to the holiday season.

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Madison Mogen, 21, top left, Kaylee Goncalves, 21, bottom left, Ethan Chapin, 20, center, and Xana Kernodle, 20, right.(Photo credit screenshot xanakernodle/Instagram)
Madison Mogen, 21, top left, Kaylee Goncalves, 21, bottom left, Ethan Chapin, 20, center, and Xana Kernodle, 20, right (Credit: xanakernodle/Instagram)

Police are urgently chasing the animal killer who butchered Pam and Jim Colbert's mini Australian Shepherd, 'Buddy' on October 21. Jim also found a mutilated rabbit with its scalp and ear sheared close to his home shortly before his pet dog's death. "Is this the act of somebody disturbed? Of course it is," Fuhrman said. The detective also added that one of the ways to identify the suspect is from any DNA left at the crime scene including the skin under the fingernails of their victims. Victim Xana's wounds suggest she fought back during the attack, said her father Jeffrey, reported Daily Mail.

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Explaining the attack, Fuhrman said, "Two victims supposedly fought back," observing their "defense wound," which means at one point, "the suspect had to control and stab, so he had to use one hand to control." "A defensive wound or evidence of somebody putting up a fight would be broken nails, scratches, skin under the fingernails. We don't know if any of that was exhibited in the autopsies in the investigation," he told the source. Recreating the crime scene, Fuhrman said, the students were "sleeping like logs", so "if you're woken up by somebody stabbing you. I'm not sure you are completely woken up until the second or third stab."

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Fuhrman said, considering its wintertime, the students have blankets or comforters over top of them. So the suspect probably stabbed through a blanket. The bed and the covers probably soaked the blood, "The floor is all simulated hardwood plank flooring, so nothing is soaking up the blood and if the blood is on the floor you'd have to walk in it at some point…" "If Xana is throwing punches, let's hope she actually tagged him in the nose and he has a bloody nose," he told the sources. "Let's just hope that, if nothing else, he is completely excited, frothed up, amped up with adrenaline. He could have saliva coming out of his mouth because he's maybe exclaiming something. That's what they're looking for."

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