NRA tweet advising doctors to 'stay in their lane' sparks nationwide backlash from medical community

Doctors and nurses shot a barrage of tweets aimed at the gun lobbying group, saying the issue of gun violence is one they're quite familiar with as first responders


                            NRA tweet advising doctors to 'stay in their lane' sparks nationwide backlash from medical community

Scores of doctors and other medical professionals have voiced their concerns about the epidemic of gun violence in America following last week's mass shooting in a California bar that claimed the lives of 12 people.

Mourners cry and comfort each other during a vigil for the victims of the mass shooting at the Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza on November 8, 2018, in Thousand Oaks, California. Twelve people including a Ventura County Sheriff sergeant and the gunman died in the mass shooting at Borderline Bar and Grill. (Getty)
Mourners cry and comfort each other during a vigil for the victims of the mass shooting at the Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza on November 8, 2018, in Thousand Oaks, California. Twelve people including a Ventura County Sheriff sergeant and the gunman died in the mass shooting at Borderline Bar and Grill. (Getty)

Doctors described the situation as a public health crisis, which drew the attention of the National Rifle Association (NRA), who brazenly tweeted last week that medical professionals and doctors should stick to their jobs and stay out of the gun-laws debate, People reported. “Someone should tell self-important anti-gun doctors to stay in their lane,” the NRA tweeted. “The medical community seems to have consulted no one but themselves.”



 

Following the controversial tweet, doctors and nurses shot a barrage of tweets aimed at the gun lobbying group. They claimed the issue of gun violence is one they're quite familiar with as first responders. The tweet-storm caused the hashtag #ThisIsMyLane to trend across the weekend. Jessica Boat Landry, a pediatrician from Houston, Texas, wrote: “If it’s my job to locate the 15 shotgun pellets in my 3-year-old patient’s abdomen, it is my job to try to prevent gun violence. This is a public health crisis, let’s work together to study and solve it!”



 

Nerissa Bauer, a doctor from Indianapolis, Indiana, responded: “My ‘lane’ is dealing with the emotional aftermath, not only endured by children but entire communities. Those surviving gun violence are victims too & can have lifelong effects.” That said, some of the medical professionals were markedly angry with NRA's unabashed tweet.



 

Judy Melinek, a forensic pathologist, tweeted: “Do you have any idea how many bullets I pull out of corpses weekly? This isn’t just my lane. It’s my f***ing highway.” Nurse practitioner Jennifer Corrigan wrote: “I’ve ruined scrubs from blood. Wiped off grey matter from my arms. Ran a level 1 with units of blood too [numerous] too count. I’ve held the hands of family members when they were told their loved one is dead. #ThisISOurLane."



 

Joining the attack was an ER physician from Sacramento, who is also an army veteran. She attacked a photo of herself in her Army uniform and tweeted as follows: “Hey NRA, in case you forgot, for us emergency medicine military physicians, GSW’s are not only in our lane, it’s our highways, byways, and airways…always. Think before you speak fools. Happy Veteran’s Day.”



 

The National Rifle Association is yet to publicly comment on the severe backlash against their tweet.