Five times Avan Jogia's 'Now Apocalypse' proved that it is truly a show for millennials

Greg Araki's television show 'Now Apocalypse' premiered on March 10 on Starz and stars Avan Jogia and Beau Mirchoff in lead roles


                            Five times Avan Jogia's 'Now Apocalypse' proved that it is truly a show for millennials

'Now Apocalypse' starring Avan Jogia (Ulysses), Beau Mirchoff (Ford), Kelli Berglund (Carly) and Roxane Mesquida (Severine) premiered on March 10 and it took director Greg Araki just one episode to set the tone of the show and make it relatable to millennials all over. 

While the show has signature Araki elements — sexual fluidity, surrealism and exploration of identity — this show is in fact about the life of four millennials who navigate the maze of life.

1. Adventure vs monotony

A still of Avan Jogia from his show 'Now Apocalypse'. (Source: YouTube)
A still of Avan Jogia from his show 'Now Apocalypse'. (Source: YouTube)

"So, yeah, I realise that one day these crazy adventures will probably get me into some gigantic trouble I can't get out of. But it's almost like I can't help myself. I do shit sometimes and I really don't know why. To avoid boredom, I guess, to feel alive. Just for the fu****** f*** of it,"  says Uly who has just had sex with a married man.

Millennials tend to break the monotony in their lives by doing something crazy, something that would change their lives, something to help them get out of a rut, and this line for the show hits the nail on the head.

2. The existential crisis

Avan Jogia as Ulysses in show 'Now Apocalypse'. (Source: Starz)
Avan Jogia as Ulysses in show 'Now Apocalypse'. (Source: Starz)

"Everything about my life right now is a question mark, which pretty much explains what this thing (vlogging) is about. It's more like a place to download the shit that is in my head to keep it from exploding," says Uly to his followers.

Which millennial hasn't gone through an existential crisis? The question of what are we doing and what do we really like doing plagues the minds of millennials everywhere and this dialogue pretty much captures the feeling.

Avan Jogia and Kelli Berglund play friends in Starz's show 'Now Apocalypse'. (Source: YouTube)
Avan Jogia and Kelli Berglund play friends in Starz's show 'Now Apocalypse'. (Source: YouTube)

3. Exaggerated emotions

When Uly discusses his premonitions for the future with Carly and says, "Feels like we are teetering on the brink of total annihilation", Carly responds, "Well, that is every fu***** day now in this tragic shit show era we are living in." The exaggeration inherent in their statements — be it about psychic premonitions or about life being tragic — the relatability is visible.

4. Conversations around relationships

Uly and Carly then switch to talking about boys and cyberdating. Uly confesses how one of the guys — Gabriel played by Tyler Posey — did not respond after planning to meet.

Carly responds, "Let me guess, he flaked. Look, this guy is a gnarly 300-pound catfish." Meaning, he might not look the same as his profile picture.  Uly shows a picture of a hot guy and says, this is why I have been pushing to meet him in real life. He also says, "I know it sounds hokey, but I just get this vibe that we are destined to be. Just looking at him makes me dizzy, hard."

That's when Carly recalls how when she had initially met her boyfriend (Desmond Chiam). It was something similar. But, now, she explains how he has weird requests while they are in the middle of having sex. She says, "Set the bar low. Very, very low." How familiar does this sound? Very, very familiar?

Roxane Mesquida plays Severine in 'Now Apocalypse'. (Source: Starz)
Roxane Mesquida plays Severine in 'Now Apocalypse'. (Source: Starz)

5. Sexual ambiguity

Uly is not ready to be boxed, Carly secretly cams for cash, and Severine is not up for monogamy. The show is filled with characters that champion sexual fluidity and freedom to choose multiple partners. When Ford asks his girlfriend Severine about wanting to call her his girlfriend, she responds with an 'I don't care what you call me'. He then broaches the subject of exclusivity and her explanation is hilarious and yet understandable. 

Her explanation goes, "You know, I believe that monogamy is a form of social control which is contrary to our nature. For centuries, humans migrated and hunted together to form groups and shared everything. Food, childcare, sexual partners. They were very promiscuous. And they strengthened their relationships. But then agriculture came along and people became obsessed with ownership and private property."