New Yorkers blame 'villain' Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez for loss of 25,000 jobs after Amazon cancels headquarters plan

According to a Siena College poll, at least 38 percent of voters from the state of New York picked the 29-year-old lawmaker as the story's biggest "villain."


                            New Yorkers blame 'villain' Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez for loss of 25,000 jobs after Amazon cancels headquarters plan

The youngest congresswoman in US history, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, is increasingly being blamed for Amazon's decision to cancel its plan of setting up its headquarters in New York City.

Reports state that New Yorkers blame the Democratic socialist more than any other politician for the firm's move, which cost the region around 25,000 jobs.

According to a Siena College poll, at least 38 percent of voters from the state of New York picked the 29-year-old lawmaker as the story's biggest "villain," and just 12 percent of the respondents said that she was instead a "hero."

Twenty six percent of the respondents blamed Amazon as the villain, the Daily Mail reported.

Ocasio-Cortez faced intense criticism in February for her opposition to the Amazon deal, which would have brought nearly 25,000 jobs to the region. Amazon eventually changed its decision about building its headquarters in Queens, scrapping the idea altogether.

Shortly after its decision, the firm put up a billboard in Times Square, offering a mocking "thanks" to Ocasio-Cortez for her opposition. Amazon blamed the NY congresswoman and other opponents for its decision to kill the deal, saying that the lawmakers had created a hostile "environment" for the company in the region.

Activists and community members who opposed Amazon's plan to move into Queens rally in celebration of Amazon's decision to pull out of the deal, in the Long Island City neighborhood, February 14, 2019 in the Queens borough of New York City. (Getty Images)
Activists and community members who opposed Amazon's plan to move into Queens rally in celebration of Amazon's decision to pull out of the deal, in the Long Island City neighborhood, February 14, 2019 in the Queens borough of New York City. (Getty Images)

The lawmaker had celebrated Amazon's decision to pull out of the deal as she had objected to the online retail giant receiving $2.8 billion in tax breaks.

"Today was the day a group of dedicated, everyday New Yorkers and their neighbors defeated Amazon’s corporate greed, its worker exploitation and the power of the richest man in the world," Ocasio-Cortez had tweeted in February, marking a victory.

However, supporters of the job plan pointed out that the deal would have brought in $27 billion in long-term tax revenues, nearly 9 times as much as the giveaways to Amazon.

Siena College pollster Steven Greenberg, on Monday, said: "While some may have celebrated Amazon’s announcement to pull the plug, the vast majority of New Yorkers of every stripe thought it was bad for the Empire State."

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) speaks to the media about Amazon scrapping its plans to build a new headquarters in Queens, New York, on Capitol Hill February 14, 2019 in Washington, DC. (Getty Images)
Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) speaks to the media about Amazon scrapping its plans to build a new headquarters in Queens, New York, on Capitol Hill February 14, 2019 in Washington, DC. (Getty Images)

"By a wide margin, New Yorkers would support the deal coming back together. ... There is an overwhelming feeling that its cancellation was bad for the state," he added. 

The poll comes at a time when the New York lawmaker's own poll numbers are dramatically sinking. According to the poll data released by the Gallup Organization on Friday, Ocasio Cortez's public approval rating nosedived between September and February.

Although the lawmaker's popularity has catapulted over the past few months, the number of people who have unfavorable views of the 29-year-old has grown faster than her fan base, according to Gallup surveys. The polls also state that she has more admirers among non-whites, women, self-identified Democrats and Americans between the age 18-35. Every other demographic is against her.