Elderly man removes Trump t-shirt to cast vote after being told he can't wear it in polling booth

Todd Price, one of the people standing in line to vote, uploaded pictures of the incident onto his Facebook post


                            Elderly man removes Trump t-shirt to cast vote after being told he can't wear it in polling booth

A man in South Carolina was forced to cast his ballot shirtless at a polling booth after he was wrongly informed that he can't wear his Donald Trump shirt while voting. When the unidentified elderly man got to the polling station — Murrells Inlet-Garden City Fire Department — to cast his vote, he was told by some people there that he would not be allowed to vote if he wore the shirt. Todd Price, one of the people standing in line to vote, uploaded pictures of the incident onto his Facebook post.

He wrote in the caption: "Vote Nekkid! Good turn out at Murrells Inlet Fire Department precinct - but they made this poor guy take off his Trump shirt to vote. I thought it was ok as long as the shirt wasn’t for someone on the ballot?"



 

The shirtless elderly man can be seen in the pictures Price took walking in front of a fire truck with a blue t-shirt in his hands. An elderly woman can be seen next to the man and she looks amused by the entire situation. She can be seen holding a red cap in her hands that looks a lot like a MAGA cap.

Price spoke to CNN and said: "When this gentleman got up to the poll worker, they told him he couldn't come in with his shirt on, so he just took it off, tossed it down on the ground there and voted shirtless and then came out and put it back on."

The South Carolina Election Commission, however, said that the decision to stop the elderly voter from casting his ballot while wearing the Trump shirt was a "mistake". Chris Whitmire, a spokesperson for the Election Commission, said that the shirt did not break any of the voting rules because Trump is not on the election ballot for the midterms.

He told CNN: "The shirt in question didn’t relate to a candidate in this election. It’s an understandable mistake. Poll managers are volunteers that are working hard out there, trying to do the right thing. If you closely read the handbook on campaign material, that didn’t violate the definition of material."

Sandy Martin, director of Horry County Voter Registration and Elections, had a different interpretation of Election Day rules governing polling places. "It is considered campaign material whether it is relevant to the election or not," Martin said.

In other parts of the country, various states were buckling under the massive voter turnout and there were machines breaking down in many polling stations forcing people to wait for long hours in line. Atlanta and New York were under a lot of pressure with people leaving stations as the wait times increased to more than three hours. Citizens arrived at a high school in Detroit to cast their vote but found no machines there to vote. A gun scare in Florida caused one polling station to be put under a lockdown for 30 minutes.