Flushing drugs down drain will create 'meth gators', warn cops after they foil a man's bid to get rid of drugs

The officers found a suspect trying to flush methamphetamine and paraphernalia down the toilet in his home, prompting them to issue the warning.


                            Flushing drugs down drain will create 'meth gators', warn cops after they foil a man's bid to get rid of drugs

The police in Tennessee are urging people to stop flushing their drugs down the toilet, out of concern for the animals that live in the local waters. In a Facebook post, that appears to have been taken down now, the  Loretto police said, "Now our sewer guys take great pride in releasing water that is cleaner than what is in the creek, but they are not really prepared for meth. Ducks, geese, and other fowl frequent our treatment ponds and we shudder to think what one all hyped up on meth would do," they reportedly said. 

The officers found a suspect trying to flush methamphetamine and paraphernalia down the toilet in his home on Saturday that led the police to issue the warning. The man, Andy Perry, according to the Columbia Herald, tried to flush down 12 gm of methamphetamine, 24 fluid ounces of liquid meth, and several items of paraphernalia but was unsuccessful.  

The police said it was becoming a genuine cause of concern for the animals. "When you send something down the sewer pipe it ends up in our retention ponds for processing before it is sent downstream," they said. "Furthermore, if it made it far enough we could create meth-gators in Shoal Creek and the Tennessee river down in North Alabama. They’ve had enough methed-up animals in the past few weeks without our help. So, if you need to dispose of your drugs just give us a call and we will make sure they are disposed of in the proper way," they said in the statement. 

Earlier this month, a man was arrested in Alabama for feeding his pet squirrel meth, the Independent reported. The police called the animal, named Deeznutz, an "attack squirrel" and that the man had fed it meth to make it aggressive. The alleged meth feeder, Mike Paulk, had denied the claims that he had fed Deeznutz drugs. He had been charged with illegal possession of wildlife. The laws prevent having a squirrel for a pet, in Alabama.

As per a report in USA Today, a jungle python in Australia reportedly required six weeks of detoxification after absorbing meth through its skin in a lab. The python behaved more aggressively and erratically, a senior overseer at the John Morony correctional complex told The Telegraph. 

 

 
 

 
 



 

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