Who is Marjorie Taylor Greene? Georgia Republican becomes first QAnon supporter to win race for House

In a 2017 video posted on social media, Greene said that the theories were 'worth listening to'

Who is Marjorie Taylor Greene? Georgia Republican becomes first QAnon supporter to win race for House
Marjorie Taylor Greene (Getty Images)
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Republican Marjorie Taylor Greene was elected to Congress as a Representative for Georgia's 14th District on Election night. Greene's victory was guaranteed even before the elections after her opponent, Democrat Kevin Van Ausdal, dropped out of the race in September after he was forced to vacate the house he shared with his wife as part of divorce proceedings. Greene is now the first QAnon supporter to be elected to Congress.

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A Forbes report states that in videos posted on Facebook in 2017, Greene supported the far-right QAnon conspiracy theory, saying that the theories were "worth listening to." In posts published on the now-defunct "American Truth Seekers" website in 2017, Greene wrote favorably of the QAnon conspiracy theory, suggested that Hillary Clinton murdered her political enemies, and ruminated on whether mass shootings were orchestrated to dismantle the Second Amendment. She later distanced herself from the conspiracy theory and rejected the label of "QAnon candidate." 

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In more than 50 posts on the defunct website, Greene commented on the news of the day in blogs that built on articles from far-right outlets like Breitbart and fake news websites including YourNewsWire. In one post, she chronicled what she claimed was "disturbing behavior that seems to keep [rearing its] ugly heads. Child Sex, Satanism, and the Occult all associated with the Democratic Party."

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In January 2018, Green wrote about QAnon, the right-wing conspiracy theory that claims President Donald Trump is leading a secret war against a "deep state" of "Satan-worshiping pedophiles." "Recently, there has been a lot of chatter in small circles among those who search for the truth," Greene wrote. "There has been an anonymous voice, with obvious intelligence beyond the normal person telling of things to come. They call themselves Q. Make no mistake, Q is a patriot."

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Greene expressed support for a conspiracy theory that a plane did not hit the Pentagon during the September 11 attacks, saying that "it's odd there's never any evidence shown for a plane in the Pentagon," despite video evidence. She later admitted that the 9/11 conspiracy theory was "not correct."

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Earlier this year, in September, Greene posted a photoshopped graphic of herself brandishing a gun while standing next to the three progressive members of Congress known as “The Squad”—Rep. Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY), Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.), and Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.). Greene claimed that it was time for Republicans to "go on the offense against these socialists who want to rip our country apart." The image was later taken down by Facebook for violating its policies. This prompted Greene to claim that Democrats were "trying to cancel me out before I've even taken the oath of office."

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Politico reported that in Facebook Live videos, Greene also suggested that Muslims do not belong in government; she thinks Black people “are held slaves to the Democratic Party”; called George Soros, a Jewish Democratic megadonor, a Nazi; and said she would feel “proud” to see a Confederate monument if she were Black because it symbolizes progress made since the Civil War.

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