Authorities share terrifying video of woman escaping California wildfires hoping people will heed evacuation warnings

Law enforcement authorities in California shared the terrifying footage hoping it will serve as a lesson to others about heeding evacuation warnings


                            Authorities share terrifying video of woman escaping California wildfires hoping people will heed evacuation warnings

A bone-chilling wildfire video was shared by California authorities on social media so as to urge residents to obey evacuation orders as soon as they are broadcasted.

Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department Headquarters tweeted the frightening footage on Monday. It was recorded by Rebecca Hackett, who was desperately trying to save her life and escape from the raging flames of the Woolsey Fire in Southern California. "This very graphic video shows the dangers of a fast-moving fire and how important it is to leave affected areas after fire officials declare an evacuation order," the tweet read.

"The fire came so quickly," Hackett later said. "One minute it was calm and then suddenly they were on top of us," she said, according to the tweet.

She can be heard crying "Oh my god" in the video as she begs God to keep her safe and make it out alive while driving across the windy roads of Malibu. The flames, which are first seen from a distance, suddenly engulf the road ahead of Hackett's vehicle as she crosses a tunnel, People reported.



 

As she continues to record the deathly scene of flaming debris and flares hitting her windshield, the screen changes from a normal dark road to nothing but a shroud of crimson reflecting from the wildfire. Fortunately, Hackett made it out in time. However, she couldn't believe she survived the ordeal. "I thought I was going to die," she said.

According to Cal Fire, the Woolsey Fire has destroyed innumerable homes in Southern California after burning through 97,620 acres and was only 47 percent contained as of Wednesday morning. Residents from Ventura and Los Angeles counties have been severely affected. At least 180 structures have been leveled by the fire as more than 8,000 firefighters work to contain it from spreading further.

Cars destroyed by the Camp Fire sit in the lot at a used car dealership on November 9, 2018, in Paradise, California. Fueled by high winds and low humidity, the rapidly spreading Camp Fire ripped through the town of Paradise and has quickly charred 70,000 acres and has destroyed numerous homes and businesses in a matter of hours. (Getty Images)
Cars destroyed by the Camp Fire sit in the lot at a used car dealership on November 9, 2018, in Paradise, California. Fueled by high winds and low humidity, the rapidly spreading Camp Fire ripped through the town of Paradise and has quickly charred 70,000 acres and has destroyed numerous homes and businesses in a matter of hours. (Getty Images)

Several prominent personalities from Hollywood and the music industry who live in Southern California have lost their homes due to the blaze, including Miley Cyrus, Gerard Butler, Neil Young, and Robin Thicke.

Cal Fire reported that meanwhile, Camp Fire in Northern California burned through 135,000 acres by Wednesday after breaking out the week before. Causing the worst damage among the three wildfires, it has already claimed 42 lives and left numerous homes and structures decimated. It was only 35 percent contained as of Monday.

Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea announced on Monday night that so far, the three massive fires ravaging Northern and Southern California have killed at least 58 people combined, making it the worst wildland fire in the state's history. During a press briefing on Monday, Gov. Jerry Brown said: “This is truly a tragedy that all Californians can understand and respond to. It’s a time to pull together and work through these tragedies."