Kuwaiti woman jailed filming housemaid falling seventh floor balcony fell

The 12-second video prompted authorities to take action against the employer after it sparked a massive outrage on Arab social media


                            Kuwaiti woman jailed filming housemaid falling seventh floor balcony fell

WARNING: DISTRESSING CONTENT

A Kuwaiti woman was put behind bars after she was caught filming her domestic help falling from a seventh-floor balcony as she tried to flee from her apartment.

The Ethiopian maid is seen screaming and crying for help in the disturbing footage as she slowly loses her grip after hanging on with one hand to a window frame and falls down on to a metal awning seven stories below. The footage posted online by the woman filming the whole incident shows the endangered woman shouting "hold me, hold me," before her fall.

Stunningly, according to multiple reports, the woman survived the fall and walked away with minor injuries including a broken arm.

That said, the cruel woman recording the footage has now been imprisoned for a year and eight months for refusing to help her housemaid and threatening her life. She is heard in the video saying, "Oh crazy, come back."

We would like to warn that the footage can be distressing to some viewers.

The video went viral in March last year, when she was charged with “filming an individual without consent and publishing a video of an individual without consent.”

The accused claimed during her trial that she chose to record the incident as she wanted to have proof of the fact that "she didn't hurt" the domestic worker, according to Stepfeed. The publication reported that the 12-second video prompted authorities to take action against the employer after it sparked a massive outrage on Arab social media.

According to The Independent, there are around 600,000 domestic workers in Kuwait, with most of them being migrants to the oil-rich Gulf states.

Due to the country's kafala system of visa sponsorship, domestic workers are restricted from changing jobs without the permission of their employer, resulting in several complaints of unchecked abuse.

Owing to the kafala system, millions of domestic workers across the Arab world are deprived of their most basic rights, Stepfeed reports.

Despite some progress having been made in 2015 to protect these embattled workers, Human Rights Watch says the kafala system “remains a major obstacle to domestic workers’ rights”.