'Kings of Pain': Rob Alleva and Adam Thorn end up with blistered legs after being bitten by a 'Biblical' beetle

This week was by far the worst in terms of damage, with Adam Thorn and Rob Alleva leaving Bali with some scars that will take forever to heal.


                            'Kings of Pain': Rob Alleva and Adam Thorn end up with blistered legs after being bitten by a 'Biblical' beetle
This week's episode of Kings of Pain is not for the faint of heart. (History)

'Kings of Pain', History's scripted reality show is absolutely not for the faint of heart and as the series edges towards its season finale, the bites, stings, and venom get worse. This week was by far the worst in terms of damage, with Adam Thorn and Rob Alleva leaving Bali with some scars that will take forever to heal. Unless you're prepared to see some flesh burns and pus, don't watch it this week.

 Rove Beetle (Staphylinidae)

Pain Index score: 21/30

Rove Beetle (Paederus littoralis) (Getty Images)

They are tiny insects, barely seen if you're preoccupied with something else. Their venom doesn't hurt and they don't sting, but by the time you know you've been attacked by the beetle, it's too late. The skin starts to blister, get filled with pus and the excruciating pain lasts for days.

The origins of the rove beetle go back to 200 million years and fossils have been found of the species. They are an ecologically and morphologically diverse group of beetles, and commonly encountered in terrestrial ecosystems. As Adam puts it, they're literally "Biblical". 

The tiny insects, not larger than ants, have a glue-like substance in their bodies that makes them stick to their prey. They spray a coelomic fluid on the prey that leads to blisters. However, if crushed on the skin, they end up making the blisters even more severe. Rob's leg turns into the surface of the moon in this episode after a beetle is crushed on it for full effect. 

Both are left with a permanent scars on their legs.

 Fire Urchin (Asthenosoma varium)

Pain Index Score: 16.25/30

Astropyga radiata, the red urchin, fire urchin, false fire urchin or blue-spotted urchin, is a species of sea urchin in the family Diadematidae. It is a large species with long spines seen in Zanzibar, Tanzania, Africa, Indian Ocean (Getty Images)

This marine creature is one of the most beautiful ones in the sea. They're bright red with colorful blue flecks that make it look like burning embers - but they should not be touched. The fire urchin has venomous spines that can break and get under your skin causing you to feel like your skin is literally on fire. Their venom is not deadly but is capable of inflicting painful wounds, as Adam and Rob would find out.

Heart rates can get dangerously elevated and one may feel like all energy is drained from their body along with feelings of unconsciousness. It is relatively visible to divers, making injuries by accidentally stepping on one rare. But, if you're underwater and you do get stung, the results could be dangerous.

But, in comparison to the rest of the marine creatures we've seen on this show, the urchin was relatively alright.

More nasty bites and stings coming up next week. Catch it on History every Tuesday at 10/9c. 

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