Did Jeffrey Epstein and Princess Diana have a relationship? New book reveals shocker

'Too Famous' is a recently released collection of work by renowned American journalist Michael Wolff


                            Did Jeffrey Epstein and Princess Diana have a relationship? New book reveals shocker
The book includes a previously unpublished interview with Epstein, where he opens up about Diana and himself (@Shippinbot/Twitter and Wikimedia)

A new book has revealed shocking details about how Jeffrey Epstein knew Princess Diana and had accompanied her to various events. The book includes a previously unpublished interview with Epstein. 'Too Famous' is a recently released collection of work by renowned American journalist Michael Wolff. In the interview, he asked Epstein if he went out with Diana. "I escorted her on occasion," Epstein, who was found dead in a prison cell in 2019 at the age of 66, had replied.

Epstein, however, did not provide details of where he went with Diana. There are no photographs that could serve as evidence either. It is speculated, however, that the outings may have taken place during her visits to New York, where Epstein owned a £37million townhouse.

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Any relationship between Diana and Epstein would have been before Epstein's 2008 conviction for procuring a child for prostitution and soliciting a prostitute. However, Diana’s former brother-in-law Andrew remained friends with Epstein even after he was released from jail. 

Epstein had reportedly befriended Princess Diana’s bridesmaid Clementine Hambro. In 1999, she was invited to Epstein’s Santa Fe home to discuss art. She flew to Little Saint James in the US Virgin Islands in his jet a month later as his guest. "I was not abused, nor did I see anyone abused. I was clearly very lucky," Clemmie, who is Winston Churchill’s great-granddaughter, said. 

Recent podcast revealed shocker

A new podcast about Victoria’s Secret has delved deep into the origin of one of the most iconic brands in the world, and the unhealthy practices followed by its models to keep working for it. 'Fallen Angel' has also investigated the “very sinister ecosystem” of the lingerie giant and the connection its founder Lex Wexner had with disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein.

“I think … Les Wexner and Jeffrey Epstein’s relationship was deep,” said Vanessa Grigoriadis, a journalist and the podcast’s co-host. “And there are many people who believe that the bulk of Epstein’s money — the money that Epstein used to buy all these extraordinary properties and create an image for himself that attracted all these wealthy men to his side, and also abuse all of these women and girls — most likely came from Les Wexner.”

In 2019, Epstein died in an apparent suicide while he was in federal custody; the 66-year-old was facing up to 45 years in prison on charges of sex-trafficking several teenage girls. Eventually, Wexner claimed that he had been “taken advantage of” and was "embarrassed" by his connection with Epstein. 

The podcast also talks about what it is like to be a VS model. Considering the kind of body image that the lingerie giant promoted, many models reportedly went down a “path of eating disorders, poor health, depression, anxiety, and other issues". Among the women who have opened up about the brand's terrifying beauty standards is Australian model Bridget Malcolm, who spoke about suffering from an eating disorder in an attempt to achieve “sample size”. 

She also claimed that her agents suggested she do cocaine to lose weight. “I was reliant on anti-anxiety medication to get through the night….My body wasn’t working,” she said on the podcast. “I didn’t feel present at all. I was not there. I’m one of countless women, not just models, but women all around the globe who have been damaged by the story that they put out. And I know among models, it has hurt so many of us."

Grigoriadis told New York Post that the brand's unethical journey deserves to be brought to the fore. “I grew up with this stuff pumping through my veins. And it has never really been grappled with in the way that we do in this podcast,” she said. “We all bought into this for a really long time and without proper questioning…40 years of wreaking havoc on women’s psyches. And they have to answer to that.”