'Into the Dark: Flesh and Blood': Episode 2 of Hulu's anthology-horror puts its own eerie spin to Thanksgiving

Kimberly is so shaken by the murder of her mother that she develops a deep-rooted fear of leaving her house. But for how long will her own home be safe?


                            'Into the Dark: Flesh and Blood': Episode 2 of Hulu's anthology-horror puts its own eerie spin to Thanksgiving

Hulu's ongoing attempt at anthology horror stories has been a neat success so far. For the clueless, we are talking about the network's recent series, 'Into the Dark' - which is set to showcase a set of horror stories, in the form of monthly episodic releases, with each episode focussing on a festival that signifies its respective month. Arriving this November 2 will be the show's episode number two, titled 'Flesh and Blood', the teaser/trailer for which offers quite the creepy, eerie first look into the network's representation of modern-day slasher-horror tales.

Since its release a month ago with the commencement of the spooky-season, aka the month of October, the show managed to peak the interests of many horror buffs, with its first episode, 'The Body', that focused on Halloween. The story revolved around a professional assassin, whose dark, twisted humor and mannerisms at going about his job, offered a cheeky satire at our existing social scenario.

But 'Flesh and Blood' is not your intellectual horror. Instead, it plays around the classical elements and has seemingly - single-handedly so far too - elevated the show's relevance when it comes to being classified as a horror.



 

Evidently enough, as its November release signifies, the episode revolves around the festive occasion of Thanksgiving. But not all is warm and fuzzy, even though the first look, offers a glimpse into the picture-perfect life of the protagonist. The official synopsis on the show's Wikipedia page, describes the episode as: "A year after her mother’s death, Kimberly begins to suspect that she is in danger in the home, but she can’t leave and doesn’t know whom she can trust."

If you look closely into the first looks revealed, you can see a warm, frame-worthy Thanksgiving dinner in progress, with Kimberly (Diana Silvers) sitting down with her mom (Meredith Salenger) and her dad, Henry (Dermot Mulroney).

Seems pretty simple, and nothing that viewers haven't witnessed on their screens before, right? Well, not really, because this seemingly classic horror also toys with the issue of latent agoraphobia in subtle ways. The way Sidney Prescott from the original 'Scream' franchise could never feel at home even within the four walls of the house she grew up in, 'Flesh and Blood' dabbles on the thin line that exists between being cozy within the comforts of your house, and slowly becoming dangerously dependent on it - to the point where this voluntary confinement starts suffocating you in return.

Diana Silvers as Kimberly from Hulu's Into the Dark episode 2: Flesh and Blood.
Diana Silvers as Kimberly from Hulu's Into the Dark episode 2: Flesh and Blood.

But even though this evolution of agoraphobia into claustrophobia and an inevitable sense of paranoia in one's own home is delivered impeccably by the wonderful casting, the episode does leave viewers feeling a little deprived when it comes to the sole theme of it all. There isn't your regular good old turkey being flaunted in the dining table, nor the merriment of what happens to be the most wholesome festival of the year.

However, as disposable as the theme might seem, the fact that there's a killer on the loose keeps viewers on the edge of their seats because, even for those who have witnessed just the first trailer, it's clear that Kimberly's father isn't entirely the warm and sweet dad that he superficially seems. There is something off about him, just the way there is something off about the entire festival's connection with the family. So even though there aren't any violent scenes of humans being shoved inside the oven and baked instead of the traditional turkey, 'Flesh and Blood' does what a classic horror does the best, and makes you question even the most seemingly harmless company you have around you.