After nude leak, Iggy Azalea's decision to 'disappear' is good for her mental health: Hollywood crisis manager

The nude photos were the outtakes from her shoot for 2016 GQ magazine cover and the magazine has already condemned the leak


                            After nude leak, Iggy Azalea's decision to 'disappear' is good for her mental health: Hollywood crisis manager

Iggy Azalea became the latest celebrity to be the victim of nude leaks after outtakes from her shoot for 2016 GQ magazine cover were shared on social media.

While the perpetrator is yet to be identified, the singer is on a self-imposed break from social media. Being the boss that she is, Azalea is taking measures to get through this tumultuous period in her life.

According to Ronn Torossian, the CEO of 5WPR, one of the country's leading privately owned PR agencies, Azalea's statement following the leaks proves she is on the right track in terms of overcoming the harrowing event.

“She released a statement that was clear and concise, which has since been deleted from her Twitter after she found it best to deactivate all her social media accounts, but the message was also filled with emotions,” Torossian told MEA WorldWide (MEAWW).

He added that her desire to press criminal charges against the person responsible for publishing the images would be taken as a priority by the authorities in the current climate.

 

“The authorities will take on this role here and Ms. Azalea will have to wait until they have further updates regarding the leak. At this point, she will have to wait for the legal system to do its job and find the person responsible. From that point forward, she will be able to press criminal charges in terms of how this violated her privacy,” Torossian elaborates.

Deleting social media accounts and ensuring that all communications are funneled through one channel is definitely one form of crisis control, Torossian says. 

He pointed out that many celebrities who feel extremely violated and scrutinized by trolls on the internet, from the likes of Selena Gomez to Demi Lovato, have all deleted their social media accounts at one point in their career for the betterment of their mental and physical health.

“It’s better to disappear for a bit, let the authorities find the person responsible and come back into the public eye at a later time when you are not so emotional,” he opines.

GQ has already condemned the leaks.

Torossian says the leak may dent the publication's reputation with the public but, more importantly, it has risked its rapport with celebrities and high-profile clients in trusting the magazine, their photographers, and their employees.

“This is becoming GQ’s crisis because they were supposed to have deleted the images on file and it happened on their photo shoot, but that obviously was not the case,” he says.