Hurricane Hanna makes landfall in coronavirus-hit Texas, two other storms expected in Hawai and the Caribbean

According to the forecast, Southern Texas and northeastern Mexico could see heavy rainfall. Parts of the lower to middle Texas coastal plain might witness tornadoes


                            Hurricane Hanna makes landfall in coronavirus-hit Texas, two other storms expected in Hawai and the Caribbean
(Getty Images)

Hanna arrived in South Texas on Saturday, July 25, making it the first Atlantic Hurricane to strike this season. Experts have warned that the Hanna could result in life-threatening flash floods. This comes as Covid-19 has already battered the state.

According to the forecast, Southern Texas and northeastern Mexico could see heavy rainfall. Parts of the lower to middle Texas coastal plain might witness tornadoes. Experts warn of ocean swells from Texas to Louisiana.

“Hanna is expected to produce 6 to 12 inches of rain with isolated maximum totals of 18 inches through Sunday night in south Texas and into the Mexican states of Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, and northern Tamaulipas. This rain may result in life-threatening flash flooding, rapid rises on small streams, and isolated minor to moderate river flooding in south Texas," the National Hurricane Center (NHC) said.

With sustained winds of 90 mph, it has been classified as a category 1 hurricane. When wind speeds that range from 74 to 95 mph, objects could hit people, animals, and even older mobile homes. It could also cause some damage to properties.

NHC issued a storm surge warning for Port Mansfield to Port O'Connor. "There is a danger of life-threatening inundation, from rising water moving inland from the coastline during the next 24 hours in the indicated locations," the organization said in an advisory. "Persons located within these areas should take all necessary actions to protect life and property from rising water and the potential for other dangerous conditions. Promptly follow evacuation and other instructions from local officials," they added.

On July 25 at 3:50 a.m. EDT the MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite revealed very powerful thunderstorms (yellow) around Hanna’s center where cloud top temperatures were as cold as minus 80 degrees Fahrenheit, indicating the storm had strengthened (NASA/NRL)

 

Hurricane Douglas and Tropical Storm Gonzalo

Douglas is heading towards Hawaii. According to NASA, the storm has maximum sustained winds that are nearing 110 mph. Winds that range between falls under 96 and 110 mph is classified as category 2, which has a higher risk of injury.

"Douglas continues to approach the main Hawaiian islands and will pass dangerously close to, or over, the islands late tonight or through Sunday night. The close passage of Douglas brings a triple threat of hazards, including but not limited to damaging winds, flooding rainfalls, and dangerously high surf, especially along east-facing shores," NHC warned.

"Recent model trends indicate a northward shift to the path of the hurricane. Regardless of its exact track and whether it makes a direct landfall, severe impacts are still anticipated across the islands as the threats extend well away from the storm's center," said CNN meteorologist Derek Van Dam.

Douglas is expected to gradually weaken through the weekend. When it reaches the island, it will likely be called a category 1 hurricane or strong tropical storm, according to forecasts.

NASA's satellite captured Gonzalo nearing the Caribbean Islands. It is predicted to bring rainfalls and storms. However, data suggests that the storm will be a weak one. It is expected to move across the southern Windward Islands this afternoon or evening and over the southeastern Caribbean Sea on Sunday, July 26. It will weaken by July 26 night or on 27, NASA said.

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