Todd and Julie Chrisley’s first day in prison: From strip search to getting ID cards, here's a look

Todd and Julie Chrisley’s first day in prison: From strip search to getting ID cards, here's a look
Todd and Julie Chrisley were sentenced to 12 and 7 years in prison respectively for defrauding banks of $30 million (toddchrisley/Instagram)

PENSACOLA, FLORIDA: 'Chrisley Knows Best' stars Todd and Julie Chrisley have reported to their respective federal prisons on Tuesday, January 17, as they begin their nearly two-decade-long combined sentence. Before Todd Chrisley's arrival at the prison, he bid his fans a final goodbye with a video on Instagram referencing his faith. “HE is always on time,” he captioned the post along with the hashtag “#fightthegoodfight”. However, the video cannot be viewed after gospel musician Karen Peck's singing 'Four Days Late,' is banned in the US.

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Furthermore, upon arrival at their prisons on Tuesday, Todd, 53, appeared to be hiding his face with a pillow while surrendering himself at the Federal Prison Camp, Pensacola, Florida, to serve his 12-year sentence. His wife Julie, 49, was accompanied by her tearful father Harvey Hughes for her sentencing at the Federal Medical Center (FMC) in Lexington, Kentucky, to serve a seven-year term. The two federal penitentiaries are being convicted on charges that included tax fraud, wire fraud, and tax evasion. 

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What does Todd and Julie Chrisley's first day in prison look like?

On their first day, the couple was obligated to get a “thorough strip search” and a “full body X-Ray” as soon as they arrived. Initially, Todd and Julie were scanned, searched, and photographed,” as well as being given “a brown bag meal or a meal tray from the dining hall.” Their strip search included a visual inspection of the mouth, hair, ears, and genitals. "This may be a person’s first experience with the squat and cough," revealed documents from the Bureau of Prisons, obtained by HollywoodLife. In addition, “All new arrivals receive a full-body X-Ray scan, a strip search, fingerprints, and photographs.”  

Todd and Julie Chrisley's prison attire

Todd and Julie once lived a luxurious life in their massive Nashville, Tennesse, mansion while boasting about spending $300,000 on clothes in a year. However, their new lifestyle and attire are not fancy and the couple may take some time adjusting to it. New inmates "receive their R&D (release and discharge) clothes, which include a white or brown t-shirt, socks, elastic-waist bus pants, and a pair of slip-on shoes. People wear their R&D clothes until they get a complete set of institutional clothing, usually from the laundry department,” the manual stated.

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After receiving their attire, the pair will undergo procedures to obtain their ID cards which they will have to carry with them at all times for their entire stay. They will undergo “fingerprinting and photographing procedures to receive their prison ID,” which is a plastic photo identification card with details of their name and registration number, as well as eye color, height, and weight.

Todd and Julie Chrisley's evaluation 

The pair will go through a medical and psychological evaluation where “Medical staff (usually a nurse or a physician’s assistant) from the Health Services Unit conducts a brief interview of each new arrival to document the person’s overall physical health status,” the intake documents revealed. “Psychology staff member conducts a brief interview of each new arrival to ascertain their general mental health status.”

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Todd and Julie will be assigned a counselor who will provide them with a brief description of their stay and what to expect during their term. Moreover, they will be made aware of the prison amenities and services - “what the prison offers in terms of education, programming, work assignments, and recreation,” according to the handout. “At intake, staff from Special Investigative Supervisor (SIS) should determine if there is any reason (other than medical or psychological) why a person should not be in the general population.” After this, they will be sent to their respective housing arrangement behind bars where they will spend the rest of the sentencing. 

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