Ex-cop Roy Oliver found guilty of murder of 15-year-old Jordan Edwards

Honor roll student Jordan Edwards was shot dead on April 29 last year when he was leaving a party in the


                            Ex-cop Roy Oliver found guilty of murder of 15-year-old Jordan Edwards

Roy Oliver, the former Balch Springs, Texas police officer who fatally shot 15-year-old honour roll student Jordan Edwards on April 29 last year, was found guilty of murder on Tuesday. Thirty eight-year-old Oliver was found not guilty of two counts of aggravated assault for firing shots into a vehicle of five teenagers.

Last year, Edwards was leaving a party with his older brother and three other friends in the Dallas-Fort Worth suburb when they heard gunshots. Officers at the scene said they were responding to a call from “drunk teens.” The Balch Springs police chief noted Oliver, who was with a second officer, Tyler Gross, shot at the teens as the car drove away. One of the teens, a front seat passenger, was Edwards.



 

 

He was shot in the back of the head and died at the scene. In initial reports, the police department said the car was driving in reverse toward the officers, but they later retracted those statements.

Lead prosecutor Michael Snipes gives a closing argument during the eighth day of the trial of fired Balch Springs police officer Roy Oliver, who is charged with the murder of 15-year-old Jordan Edwards, at the Frank Crowley Courts Building in Dallas, Texas on August 27, 2018. (Photo by Rose Baca-Pool/Getty Images)
Lead prosecutor Michael Snipes gives a closing argument during the eighth day of the trial of fired Balch Springs police officer Roy Oliver, who is charged with the murder of 15-year-old Jordan Edwards, at the Frank Crowley Courts Building in Dallas, Texas on August 27, 2018. (Photo by Rose Baca-Pool/Getty Images)

In the initial testimony, Oliver said he feared Gross was in danger, so he fired shots at the car. However, Gross testified that he never felt like he was in danger or that he needed to use lethal force, the Associated Press reported.

Oliver’s attorney, Bob Gill, said the jury should base its decision on what Oliver knew at the time. “It doesn’t matter that looking back on it, in hindsight, we’d all make a different decision now,” Gill told the jury Monday. “We have to look at it how Roy Oliver saw it at the time and what he saw was a significant threat to his partner.”

Prosecutor Mike Snipes argued there were nine seconds between Oliver obtaining his weapon and firing the first shot.

He paused for nine seconds during his statement to show the court room just how long Snipes had to assess the situation.

“That’s who this case is about. That kid right there,” Snipes said while pointing to a photo of Edwards. “It’s not a fairy tale. He really was that great. He really did have a 3.5 GPA, he really did want to go to Alabama to play football for them, he really did work out every day, he really did have a million friends, he really did have a nickname ‘Smiley.’ He was the real deal.”