Electoral College votes on Monday to confirm Joe Biden's presidential win amid Trump's claim of voter fraud

The state-by-state Electoral College votes, which are traditionally considered an afterthought, have taken unprecedented importance this year amidst Trump's false claims of an election win


                            Electoral College votes on Monday to confirm Joe Biden's presidential win amid Trump's claim of voter fraud
(Getty Images)

Electors from across the country will finally gather in state capitols on Monday, December 14, to officially vote for Democrat leader Joe Biden as the next president of the United States. The formal vote will finally put an end to President Donald Trump's attempt to overturn his election loss. The Republican leader, ever since Election Day, November 3, has consistently refused to concede to Biden despite the latter winning a clear majority of electoral and popular votes. Trump and his campaign have refuted the election results claiming massive "voter fraud." Trump's legal team, however, has not provided any evidence to support their claims. 

The state-by-state Electoral College votes, which are traditionally considered an afterthought, have taken unprecedented importance this year amidst Trump's false claims of an election win. Trump, over the past few months, has also pressured his state loyalists to throw the election results out and declare him as the winner. Trump's legal team, which has filed multiple lawsuits in swing states over alleged election fraud, has been facing consistent defeat in courts. The US Supreme Court, on December 11, also rejected a lawsuit filed by Texas, challenging Biden's win in Michigan, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, and Georgia. The failed lawsuit, which was being claimed as "the big one" by the Trump Team, was the latest blow in a string of defeats for the Trump campaign.

In an effort to officially declare the winner of a presidential election, the United States uses an electoral college system, with every state having at least 3 electoral votes. Presidential candidates seek to garner 538 total electoral votes and a candidate must have at least 270 votes to declare an election win. The former vice president, according to projections by the Associated Press, is expected to receive 306 electoral votes while Trump is projected to receive 232 votes. However, the number could reportedly be changed if some of the "rogue" electors change their decision and vote for Trump instead. Although such a scenario is unlikely to happen, a vast majority would back their state results and officials do not expect a different election result on Monday.

After the electors officially declare their winner, the votes cast will be formally sent to Congress to be counted on January 6, marking the final stage of America's election process. Days later the victor's inauguration will be held on January 20. 

President Trump, on Sunday, December 13, refused to discuss whether he would attend President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration in January and instead continued to insist that the Democrats "lost badly" in the 2020 presidential elections. Trump, in an interview with Fox News host Brian Kilmeade, was asked whether he would "show up at the inauguration," to which the president replied saying: "I don't want to talk about that."

The Republican leader then claimed that he did not lose the election to Biden. "I want to talk about this: we've done a great job," he said. "I got more votes than any president in the history of our country. In the history of our country, right? Not even close—75 million far more than Obama, far more than anybody. And they say we lost an election. We didn't lose. If I got 10 million fewer votes, they say I couldn't have lost." 

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