Eight dogs that viciously mauled a 28-year-old dog walker to death will remain 'in kennels for a year'

Eight dogs that viciously mauled a 28-year-old dog walker to death will remain 'in kennels for a year'
(Representative picture, Getty Images)

CATERHAM, ENGLAND: Altogether eight vicious dogs were taken into custody after they mauled a 28-year-old dog walker to death. They are expected to be held in kennels for a year.

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The incident took place on Thursday, January 12, when a professional dog walker from London, was attacked by the dogs in Caterham, Surrey, just before 14.45 GMT. It was reported that one of the dogs she was holding, bit another woman before turning on her. The second woman was immediately rushed to a hospital while the dog walker was pronounced dead at the scene. Police launched an investigation into the matter and seized the eight dogs including two dachshunds, a collie, a cockapoo and an 11st Leonberger called Shiva.

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The animals are currently being held in private kennels and are under strict observation. Sources recently revealed that authorities were in a "long and complex process" of determining what role, if any, each animal played in the attack and which one inflicted the fatal wound. "This is an extremely anxious time for all the families involved, for some, if not all, it is like being parted from a baby," sources told Daily Mail.

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Two pathologists have been assigned to the case – described by a source as a "canine whodunnit." "The dogs aren’t going to be returned to their families for six to 18 months," an insider said, adding, "Realistically, it’s going to be at least 12 months as it’s such a complex process." The insider reportedly claimed that the animal’s claws and teeth would be examined closely. "Dog bites and scratches on the victim will be examined and the depth and distance between each puncture will be measured. Then the veterinary pathologist will map out the dogs’ dental forms. This might involve taking casts or measurements. He’ll look at both bits of evidence to make matches," the insider continued.

"The state of the injuries, if they are really bad, may slow this progress down. If there are lots of bites and puncture marks, it will be very difficult as the pathologist will struggle to ascertain which pairs of puncture marks went together. If that’s the case, it could be you’re never going to work out who was guilty," the insider continued, adding, "This would normally be repeated multiple times to ensure a good understanding of how the dog behaves."

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Any dogs judged too dangerous to be released may be put down. "The only way the dogs get free is after a court has given their judgment. First, the assessments need to be completed, then the paperwork is submitted, and the police complete their reports. It’s more than likely all dogs will need testing before one gets released," sources said.

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