Donald Trump might be meeting Queen Elizabeth on his trip to Britain next month

Theresa May refused to cancel Trump's visit despite the ongoing anger and protests against his administration's policies of separating migrant children from their parents


                            Donald Trump might be meeting Queen Elizabeth on his trip to Britain next month

Donald Trump might have to pay a visit to the Queen on his upcoming Britain trip next month, the US ambassador to the UK shared the news. While the itinerary of the President of the United States' is yet to be finalised, Robert Wood Johnson told Sky News that a meeting with the monarch is definitely going to be on the list. This trip to Britain on July 13 will be Trump's first visit to the country since he was elected in 2016, but, since it's not a formal visit at the invitation of UK's head of state, it does not necessitate a meeting with the Queen.

When asked if Trump is going to meet the Queen, the ambassador said: “Yes, yes, I mean he has to see the head of state. Putting his foot on British soil, it’s job one, it’s very important, very symbolic. Meeting Her Majesty is the most important thing, because she’s the head of state, and from then on, it’ll be what the President wants to do.”

Queen Elizabeth II attends a service for the Order of the British Empire at St Paul's Cathedral on March 7, 2012 in London (Getty Images)
Queen Elizabeth II attends a service for the Order of the British Empire at St Paul's Cathedral on March 7, 2012 in London (Getty Images)

The meeting is expected to be held at Windsor Castle, which has been closed for public access on July 13. When asked, a Buckingham Palace spokeswoman declined to say anything about the US ambassador's comment on the supposed meeting, or whether at all the Queen would be meeting the POTUS.

What is definitely known is that Trump is most likely going to avoid London during his visit to Britain as the president will most likely be greeted by huge protests.

On Wednesday, Theresa May refused to cancel Trump's visit despite the ongoing anger and protests against his administration's ongoing policies of separating migrant children from their parents and even going to the disturbing lengths of imprisoning them in cages at the US border.

Theresa May leaves Downing Street ahead of Prime Minister's Questions on June 20, 2018 in London (Getty Images)
Theresa May leaves Downing Street ahead of Prime Minister's Questions on June 20, 2018 in London (Getty Images)

Under the immense pressure of speaking out against the policy, May has condemned the practice as "wrong" and also assured that she's going to challenge him next month during his upcoming visit.

“When we disagree with the United States, we tell them so,” she said. “But we also have key shared interests. It is right that we are able to sit down and discuss those with the president – a president of a country with which we will continue to have a long-standing special relationship.”

Previously, Trump was to visit the UK back in February this year but had canceled the trip claiming that he's concerned about getting a hostile reception there. He also stated that he did not want to fly to Britain as he disproved of the location of the new US embassy which he was initially scheduled to open.