Democrats are preparing to pass 'strictest gun control legislation in 25 years' after latest mass shooting

The spree of recent mass shootings combined with the fact that the Democrats won the House of Representatives mean that the noise over gun control legislation is louder than ever


                            Democrats are preparing to pass 'strictest gun control legislation in 25 years' after latest mass shooting

The fact that the mass shooting at the Borderline Bar & Grill which killed 12 people has coincided with the midterm elections, in which the Democratic Party once again took back control of the House of Representatives, has meant that the clamor for gun control legislation has been louder than ever.

According to the Daily Mail, the country has not passed any significant legislation in the matter for the past 25 years, but all that is set to change with this new wave of Democrats in the House who seem determined to listen to the voices of their voters.

Indeed, it has emerged that gun control advocates spent more on Democrats in this 2018 midterm elections than their counterparts at the NRA — who themselves are known to be heavy spenders when it comes to lobbying — spent on GOP candidates.

McBath is one of many member-elects who are pushing for stricter gun legislation (Source: Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images for Vanity Fair)
McBath is one of many member-elects who are pushing for stricter gun legislation (Source: Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images for Vanity Fair)

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg-backed Everytown for Gun Safety and Americans for Responsible Solutions — the latter of which was founded by Democratic representative Gabrielle Giffords, a miraculous survivor of an assassination attempt where she was shot in the head — spent $37 million combined in the elections. In comparison, the NRA shelled out $20 million, with spokeswoman Jennifer Baker stating that funds were depleted for backing the confirmation of Supreme Court justices Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh.

This heavy backing meant that Lucy McBath, a Democratic challenger from Georgia's 6th Congressional District, was able to oust incumbent Congresswoman Karen Handel, who herself had previously been the first-ever Republican woman from Georgia to be elected to Congress. 

McBath's story is both a tragic and an inspiring one. She left her job at Delta Airlines after her son Jordan Davis was shot and killed in November 2012 in an act of gun violence and became a national spokeswoman for Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, standing for these midterms on a platform of gun control legislation and health care.

Mike Thompson, the U.S Representative for California's 5th congressional district and the Chairman of the House Gun Violence Prevention Task Force, is another who has been vocal about his backing for stricter legislation and mandatory universal background checks, especially in light of the most recent shooting in Thousand Oaks. "This new majority is not going to be afraid of our shadow," he was quoted telling the Wall Street Journal. "We know that we've been elected to do a job, and we're going to do it."

House Minority leader Nancy Pelosi also believes there will be significant action taken (Source: Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
House Minority leader Nancy Pelosi also believes there will be significant action taken (Source: Zach Gibson/Getty Images)

 

House Minority leader Nancy Pelosi, who is expected to run for Speaker of the House of Representatives come January, also believes there will be significant action taken. "Because in this Congress, the one that we're in right this minute, there is bipartisan legislation to have common sense background checks, to prevent guns going into the wrong hands," she said in an interview, according to the Mail.

And while Jason Crow of Denver, member-elect for Colorado's 6th congressional district, and Abigail Spanberger, the member-elect in Virginia's 7th congressional district, are two others who wish to enact stricter gun control, Democrats such as Conor Lamb of Pennsylvania, Joe Cunningham of South Carolina, and Katie Hill from Southern California are taking a more moderate approach.

The Democrat-majority House does come into play beginning next year, but the fact remains that the GOP retained control of the Senate, which passes federal laws and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell made it clear to reporters that it was "highly unlikely there will be restrictions passed."

Baker expressed a similar sentiment, saying, "The biggest Second Amendment implication of the election is that the pro-Second Amendment majority in the US Senate will continue to confirm pro-Second Amendment judges to the lower courts all the way to the Supreme Court."