Wreath on the Queen's coffin matches flowers she picked for her beloved husband Prince Philip's funeral

A wreath of sweet peas and other blooms were placed atop the Queen's coffin, mirroring the flowers she picked to be placed on Prince Philip's coffin

Wreath on the Queen's coffin matches flowers she picked for her beloved husband Prince Philip's funeral
The wreaths on Queen Elizabeth II's coffin (L) and Prince Philip's coffin (R) (Christopher Furlong/Getty Images, Leon Neal/WPA Pool/Getty Images)
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EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND: A lot can be said through flowers, with each bloom carrying a hidden meaning and symbol. But not everything needs to be convoluted or complex. In a simple, yet touching tribute, the wreath of flowers placed on the Queen's coffin bears a striking similarity with the one that had been prepared for her beloved husband, Prince Philip's funeral just one year ago. 

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A wreath of her favorite flowers — sweet peas, dahlias, phlox, white heather and pine fir — rested on top of Queen Elizabeth II's coffin. Prepared by the staff at the Balmoral Castle in Aberdeenshire, all the flowers were plucked from the estate itself. Among these, sweet peas had featured in the wreath offered on Prince Philip's coffin after his death in April, 2021. Notably, the flowers that made up his wreath were all chosen by his wife. 

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People gather in tribute as the cortege carrying the coffin of the late Queen Elizabeth II passes by on September 11, 2022 in Ballater, United Kingdom. Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor was born in Bruton Street, Mayfair, London on 21 April 1926. She married Prince Philip in 1947 and ascended the throne of the United Kingdom and Commonwealth on 6 February 1952 after the death of her Father, King George VI. Queen Elizabeth II died at Balmoral Castle in Scotland on September 8, 2022, and is succeeded by her eldest son, King Charles III.
People gather in tribute as the cortege carrying the coffin of the late Queen Elizabeth II passes by (Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

For those unversed in the meaning behind flowers, the Victorian language of flowers lays out the intricacies of what each bloom signifies. So, if we were to look at the flowers that made up the wreath for the Queen's coffin, the message would be brought out. According to allflorists.co.uk, sweet peas symbolize departures and goodbyes. The dahlias in the wreath stand for dignity and elegance, that is most apt for the Queen, but also represent lasting commitment between two people. The inclusion of phlox, one of her favorites, carries the message of souls being reunited with their loved ones. This is rather telling, as the Queen has now joined her late husband. Additionally, white heather and pine fir symbolize protection and hope respectively. Arranged in a simple yet pleasing manner, the floral wreath rests on top of the coffin draped with the Royal Standard of Scotland.

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On the other hand, the Duke of Edinburgh's wreath, besides sweet peas, was made up of white lilies, roses and freesias. These together stand for purity, innocence, trust and friendship.

The bearer Party found by The Queen’s Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards carry the coffin of HRH Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh to the purpose built Land Rover Hearse during the funeral of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh at Windsor Castle on April 17, 2021 in Windsor, England. Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark was born 10 June 1921, in Greece. He served in the British Royal Navy and fought in WWII. He married the then Princess Elizabeth on 20 November 1947 and was created Duke of Edinburgh, Earl of Merioneth, and Baron Greenwich by King VI. He served as Prince Consort to Queen Elizabeth II until his death on April 9 2021, months short of his 100th birthday. His funeral takes place today at Windsor Castle with only 30 guests invited due to Coronavirus pandemic restrictions.
The flowers on Prince Philip's coffin are strikingly similar to the wreath that adorns the Queen's (Adrian Dennis/WPA Pool/Getty Images)

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It is, therefore, fitting that the idea of goodbyes and departures play in heavily through the inclusion of similar flowers in the Queen's procession as she is laid in state for mourners to pay their respect. Furthermore, the nod to the flowers used in Prince Philip's funeral also speaks of the lasting commitment between the two. 

Notably, Her Majesty's coffin will remain for 24 hours at St Giles Cathedral, Edinburgh, following which she will be transported to London where her body will first travel to Buckingham Palace and subsequently to Westminster Hall. Her funeral is scheduled on September 19, 2022.

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