Women use a 'huskier' voice to seduce the men they desire into having sex, finds research

A group of European researchers gathered 30 heterosexual singles between the ages of 20 and 40 for two speed-dating events in a bid to study their behavior when it comes to mating


                            Women use a 'huskier' voice to seduce the men they desire into having sex, finds research

While mating calls in the wild usually constitute grand displays of dance or showing off one's feathers, human beings make their first sexual advances with opening lines.

Thirty heterosexual singles between the ages of 20 and 40 came together for two speed-dating events organized by a group of European researchers in an attempt to study the competitive behaviors that come into play while selecting a partner in bed. The researchers observed one important facet — voice modulation, the New York Post reports.

While studies do support the idea that women prefer a more masculine voice, and it is expected that males might assume a deeper voice when introduced to a prospective female mate, scientists were stunned to find that women also tended to drop into a "huskier" version of their voice while trying to seduce a man they wanted to bed.

Scientists were stunned to find that women also tended to drop into a "huskier" version of their voice while trying to seduce a man they wanted to bed. (Pexels)
Scientists were stunned to find that women also tended to drop into a "huskier" version of their voice while trying to seduce a man they wanted to bed. (Pexels)

Authors of the study, which is published in the current issue of Proceedings of the Royal Society B, wrote: "Our results contradict the prediction that women ubiquitously feminize their voices towards preferred potential mates. Moreover… men preferred women who spoke with a lower minimum pitch."

Each participant was asked during the trials to answer a simple "yes" or "no" to a hypothetical relationship. That said, the participant behind them was able to see their current date's popularity in the votes.

Researchers found that women reserved their perceived "sexier" voices for the men they personally found desirable, but they only did so if other women agreed with their choice. This indicated that the woman's voice is a formidable weapon when it comes to mating.

Researchers found that women reserved their perceived "sexier" voices for the men they personally found desirable. (Pixabay)
Researchers found that women reserved their perceived "sexier" voices for the men they personally found desirable. (Pixabay)

However, authors of the study found that these findings could easily translate to other areas of society. "The capacity for women and men to dynamically alter their voice pitch, therefore, has the potential to affect reproductive success, but beyond this, it may function to manipulate the perceptions and behaviors of others in a wide range of social, economic and political contexts," they wrote.

Researchers noted, aside from the performance aspects of dating, that while women gave positive votes only for a third of their dates, men said "yes" to half the women — indicating that women are way pickier than their male counterparts.