White supremacist who sent letter to Trump containing a white powder and threatened to kill him faces 140 years in prison

51-year-old Gary Gravelle was indicted on 16 counts including threats against the commander-in-chief and misleading authorities with false information regarding an explosive


                            White supremacist who sent letter to Trump containing a white powder and threatened to kill him faces 140 years in prison

A Connecticut man who threatened to kill President Donald Trump and sent others bomb threats and mail containing a suspicious white powder has now been indicted on related charges.

51-year-old Gary Gravelle was indicted on 16 counts including threats against the commander-in-chief and misleading authorities with false information regarding an explosive, Daily Mail reports.

According to the New Haven Register, Gravelle was named in the indictment as a member of the white supremacist group American Knights of Anarchy (AKA).

The anarchist, per court documents, sent Trump an envelope containing suspicious white powder and a letter that read, "I, Gary Gravelle... as a faithful soldier of the AKA, am coming to KILLDonald [sic] Trump."

Gary Gravelle, 51 (pictured), of New Haven, Connecticut, was indicted on 16 counts, including threats against the president and conveying false information about an explosive. (New Haven Police)

According to the indictment, Gravelle also sent similar envelopes to a mosque, a synagogue, and a chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

While the note claimed the powder sent to President Trump was a biotoxin, authorities later found it to be harmless.

According to NBC Connecticut, Gravelle sent letters to post officers, judges, and other government officials throughout the country. The station reported that he addressed one letter to the Thomaston Post Office, threatening to kill everyone working in the post office.

Gravelle, also known as Roland Prejean, also threatened to kill a Connecticut Superior Court Judge, a probation officer in Connecticut, several Connecticut Valley Hospital workers, and a former roommate. Furthermore, he forced an evacuation at the Thomaston Post Office after threatening he had hidden a bomb inside the premises.

The 51-year-old also made phone calls and sent out emails threatening to detonate explosives in Washington and Vermont.

Prosecutors estimate that Gravelle wrote more than 50 death letters aside from anthrax and bomb threats.

That said, the white powder was identified as baby powder and no injuries were reported as a result of the packages he sent in.

Gravelle could face a maximum prison sentence of 140 years if convicted of all 16 counts. 

According to US Attorney John Durham's statement on Friday, Gravelle was previously sentenced to 70 months in prison back in 2013. However, he was released under federal supervision in November 2015 until he was arrested on fresh charges last year.