FINALLY! Vogue sets minimum age for models at 18 to put an end to 'children being marketed as glamorous adults'

In an article on the publication's website, Vogue said that it was an attempt by the publication to create a wave of positive change in the fashion industry


                            FINALLY! Vogue sets minimum age for models at 18 to put an end to 'children being marketed as glamorous adults'

In an extremely fashionable move, Vogue has announced that it will no longer feature models who are below the age of 18 years. It is an attempt by the publication to create a wave of positive change in the fashion industry. In an article on their website, the publication says, "Fashion has long valorized youth. But the churn of 'new faces,' as rookie models are known, has become relentless. Vast numbers of them cycle through the industry at hyperspeed."

"It’s not like all these kids are destined to become stars," notes Angus Munro, a casting director who works with designers including Rick Owens and Isabel Marant. "It’s more that the business model has become, Let’s throw a bunch of spaghetti at the wall, and maybe one noodle sticks and books the Prada show." No one designed the system to work this way. But can we change it?"



The parent company of the magazine, Conde Nast announced, "In recognition of the unique vulnerability of minors thrown into a career where they have little control and where abuse has been all too commonplace, the vendor code of conduct stipulates that no model under the age of eighteen will be photographed for editorial (unless he or she is the subject of an article, in which case the model will be both chaperoned and styled in an age-appropriate manner)."

Vogue also admitted that they had been a part of the problem. "Vogue, along with a number of other publications, has played a role in making it routine for children—since that’s what they are—to be dressed and marketed as glamorous adults. No more: It’s not right for us, it’s not right for our readers, and it’s not right for the young models competing to appear in these pages. While we can’t rewrite the past, we can commit to a better future," the magazine said. Starting this month, DNA Models and The Society Management will no longer be submitting new models under the age of eighteen for show consideration in North America.

David Bonnouvrier, cofounder and CEO of DNA Model Management in New York, said, "It used to be, the fittings would take forever. Now the girls are cast to fit the dress." Chris Gay, co-CEO of Elite World Group that includes The Society Management, which represents Kendall Jenner among others, said, "It’s a numbers game. Brands want 40, 50 girls in a show, leaving less opportunity for designers to spend time with each talent. There’s no time for long fittings. But you know who fits those tiny samples?” Gay shakes his head ruefully. “Teenagers—girls who haven’t finished growing yet."

Model Karlie Kloss said, "I’m optimistic about this industry because everything I’m seeing points toward more inclusivity and more opportunities for models to have their own voice. When I started modeling at fifteen, maybe I was mature for my age—but still, I was fifteen,” she said.

“Over the ten years I’ve been in the industry, I’ve changed—my body’s developed, as any woman’s does, and my mind has developed, too.” And that, Kloss said, made her a better model than she was in her teens. “It’s not about fitting a bill; it’s about what you bring to the table, what kind of image you project to the world. It’s not just being seen—it’s being heard.”