Bones found at Vatican embassy in Rome could be those of 15-year-old girl who disappeared in 1983

The human bones were discovered during the ongoing renovation work at the Vatican embassy in Rome and authorities are now working to find out the age and gender of the remains


                            Bones found at Vatican embassy in Rome could be those of 15-year-old girl who disappeared in 1983

The discovery of human bones at the Vatican embassy to Italy which has been undergoing some renovation work has spraked new interest into the mysterious disappearance of a Vatican employee's 15-year-old daughter in 1983. The newest develpment in the case that has had investigators scratching their heads for more than three decades has brought up an old wound for the Holy See. The Vatican said on October 30 that Rome's chief prosecutor has been brought in.

NBC News also reported that forensic investigators are currently working to find out the age and gender of the bones that were discovered. They are also actively looking to find out the date of death. 

A demonstrator holds a poster of Emanuela Orlandi reading 'Missing' during Pope Benedict XVI's Regina Coeli noon prayer in St. Peter's square, at the Vatican on May 27, 2012 (Source: FILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP/GettyImages)
A demonstrator holds a poster of Emanuela Orlandi reading 'Missing' during Pope Benedict XVI's Regina Coeli noon prayer in St. Peter's square, at the Vatican on May 27, 2012 (Source: FILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP/GettyImages)

The statement released by the Vatican did not mention Emanuela Orlandi, the girl in question, but the media in the country immediately latched on to the idea that the discovery of the bones was linked to her disappearance. The Holy See only said that the bones were discovered during renovation work close to its embassy in the high-end neighborhood of Parioli.

The teen vanished after she left her family's apartment in Vatican City to go for a music lesson in Rome. Her father worked as a lay employee of the Holy See. Ever since her disappearance, her case has been linked to various other cases such as the plot to kill St. John Paul II, the financial scandal of the Vatican bank, and even the criminal underworld in Rome.



 

The major twist in the case before this one came in 2012 when the forensic police exhumed the body of a well-known mobster from the crypt of a basilica in Rome with the hopes of discovering Orlandi's remains as well. The search did not find any link. 

In more recent times, a famous Italian investigative journalist cased a firestorm when he published a five-page document that was allegedly stolen from a locked Vatican cabinet that suggested the Holy See may be the one that orchestrated Orlandi's disappearance. The Vatican immediately issued a statement saying the document was faked but it never mentioned why it was in a Vatican cabinet.

The document was allegedly written by a cardinal and went into detail on the expenses that went into Orlandi's upkeep after she vanished.