MCU does away with sexualized heroines from the comic world to give its women strong narratives and incredible stories

Right from the Avengers to the galaxy-trotting combatants - the MCU brand of superheroes is vast and quickly evolving, especially in terms of representing the women.


                            MCU does away with sexualized heroines from the comic world to give its women strong narratives and incredible stories

Over the last decade, Marvel has been busy ideating a shared, interconnected cinematic universe; where its multitude of characters frequently crosses paths leading to events of cosmic levels.

Right from the Earth-bound Avengers to the galaxy-trotting elite alien combatants - the MCU brand of superheroes is vast and quickly evolving, especially in terms of representing the female section of the comic reserve. And in doing so, the creative heads working behind the franchise has remained, more or less, loyal to the comic book's literature - except when it comes to the physical portrayal of its female heroes on the big screen.  

Instead of leading with the sexually-charged representation of some of the most popular superheroines - including the likes of Natasha Romanoff (aka Black Widow), Wanda Maximoff (Scarlet Witch) or even the more recently added, Gamora - MCU seems to have taken it upon themselves to do away with the objectification of the fairer sex. 


 

It’s all been leading to this. #InfinityWar #BlackWidow

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Hence, when a leather-clad Scarlett Johansson steps into the arena, matching punches with her male superhero counterparts - all eyes are mostly on her insane fighting skills and the dark and twisted backstory of her Russian spy-turned-Avenger. Rather than the display of skin or her fashion choices, which quite strategically remains mostly in the hues of black. 

Another portrayal, where despite few hits and misses, MCU has kept the theme of "wempowerment" alive is with the Scarlet Witch. In the Earth-616 iteration, Wanda (the alter ego), after discovering her superhuman abilities, suddenly takes on a sensuous avatar, decked in her ox-red corset, matching cape and knee-high boots. 

Thankfully, the sex appeal associated with the character was ripped off in the most recent appearance of Elizabeth Olsen-played Scarlet Witch in the Infinity Way. Olsen's superhero retained the corset - that has become iconic amongst the fans - but also stepped into a pair of pants, making her more than just an epitome of the sexualized representation. 

Although, if Olsen had it her way, she would gladly add few more changes to the costume. "I think of the costumes and what we have to wear — it’s more about iconic images because that's what these movies are... I think that's the goal with the costumes, and it's not representing the average woman," she argued slamming the unwarranted skin show.



In addition to these two characters, MCU's latest super warrior on the block, Shuri - the technologically-gifted younger sister of King T'Challa aka Black Panther - just set the right example for the cinematic franchise in the future with her array of sartorial displays.

Shuri and her fellow female Wakandans' upgraded traditional garbs, asides from omitting the sexist undertones that have been long prevailing in superhero comics, also introduces a significant element of change - that of inclusion, of different cultures, race, and countries.    

Pushing back against the former constraints Marvel movies have now begun to live the change with more women heroes starring in their own incredible stories.