Tyson Fury promises to donate $10 million from Deontay Wilder bout to help the homeless, drug addicts, and alcoholics

The former world heavyweight champion pledged to donate significant earnings to help the poor and the homeless, as well as drug addicts and alcoholics


                            Tyson Fury promises to donate $10 million from Deontay Wilder bout to help the homeless, drug addicts, and alcoholics

Tyson Fury's epic battle with WBC champion Deontay Wilder on Saturday night in Los Angeles controversially ended in a draw, with several professionals and former world champions like Floyd Mayweather, Lennox Lewis, Tony Bellew, and Carl Froch coming out to state that Fury deserved to be called the winner. Promoter Frank Warren even said he and the British Boxing Board of Control will be writing to the WBC demanding a rematch, but all the negative reactions drew attention away from Fury's philanthropy.

According to the Daily Mail, the 30-year-old former heavyweight champion had promised to donate the £8 million ($10.1 million) he earned from the bout so it could build homes for the poor and homeless. His battles with depression, alcoholism, and a debilitating cocaine addiction are well-documented, and Fury said he hoped the money could also help drug addicts and alcoholics. 

Fury's match with Wilder ended in a draw (Source: Harry How/Getty Images)
Fury's match with Wilder ended in a draw (Source: Harry How/Getty Images)

"I'm going to give it to the poor and I'm going to build homes for the homeless," he said about the prize money before the bout. "I don't really have much use for it, I'm not interested in becoming a millionaire or a billionaire. I'm a boxer, not a businessman and I'll probably go down the same route as every other boxer — skint at the end of it all," adding when he went back to Manchester, he was going to "build some homes for the homeless and set up some funds for drug addicts and alcoholics."

Fury explained how being in Los Angeles pushed him to donate his earnings even more. "I was always going to do it but being here (in California) gives me that extra push to go and do it even more," he said. "There are a lot of homeless people on the streets here, more than I've ever seen ever in my life. I'm staying in downtown LA but if you go five minutes down the road there's like – I don't know – thousands of homeless people."

The 30-year-old also revealed he would not be giving the money to his family — he shares four children with Paris, his wife of nine years — because he wanted his kids to make their own money and that "they won't appreciate it" if they didn't earn it.

Fury said he wasn't going to go "AWOL again" (Source: Harry How/Getty Images)
Fury said he wasn't going to go "AWOL again" (Source: Harry How/Getty Images)

"I believe all kids should make their own money in life because if they don't, they won't appreciate it," he said. "It's easy to spend someone else's money and the money I've earned is practically blood money. My kids have to make their own living and make their own way in life; they won't be living off my name or reputation because that's too easy a route."

"You see many of these rich people's kids doing nothing because they had it too easy. I never had it easy, I had to work for whatever I got. I was working from very young, everything I wanted in life I had to work for," he added.

Fury's story to recovery is a heartwarming one. The boxer, nicknamed the 'Gypsy King,' had famously spent 30 months away from the sport following his 2015 world-title success over Wladimir Klitschko after admitting to struggling from depression and accepting a backdated two-year UK Anti-Doping ban. However, this time around, the 30-year-old said there will be no repeats of the breakdown.

"Am I going to go AWOL again? We are prepared this time," he said, according to the BBC. "Last time was nothing to do with media. I was suffering with mental health. When you give up the passion to live, you're in a bad place. I was already depressed before the Klitschko fight, heavily. Now I am in a great place."

"Look back at the videos, I was in an ill state. Now I am happy to be healthy. The most important thing is my health. Thank God I am alive and well. I go back chin up, chest out."