Trump pressures General Motors CEO to reopen Ohio auto plant: 'I don't care, I just want it open!'

Trump, in a series of tweets on Saturday and Sunday, vented his frustrations during a conversation with General Motors CEO Mary Barra. 


                            Trump pressures General Motors CEO to reopen Ohio auto plant: 'I don't care, I just want it open!'

President Donald Trump amped up pressure on General Motors to reopen its Ohio manufacturing plant, which was recently closed, leaving 1,700 people out of work. Trump, in a series of tweets on Saturday and Sunday, vented his frustrations during a conversation with General Motors CEO Mary Barra. 

"I am not happy that it is closed when everything else in our Country is BOOMING," Trump wrote on Twitter. "I asked her to sell it or do something quickly. She blamed the UAW Union - I don't care, I just want it open!" he added referring to Barra. The United Automobile Workers (UAW) Union, represents the employees who lost their jobs when the GM plant in Lordstown closed down.



 

The president had previously told a UAW leader, David Green, to "get his act together and produce" for the Lordstown workers, according to the Daily Mail.

General Motors, later on Sunday, released a statement saying that the future of plants scheduled to be closed "will be resolved between GM and the UAW." The firm also said that it has "opportunities available for virtually all impacted employees" at plants that are to be shuttered.

Mary Barra, chief executive officer of General Motors (GM), speaks to reporters after a meeting with Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH) and Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) on Capitol Hill, December 5, 2018 in Washington, DC. GM is under fire for plans to cut around 8,000 salaried workers and 3,300 hourly workers in the United States. The plants currently slated to close are in Lordstown, Ohio, Detroit and Warren, Michigan and Baltimore. (Getty Images)
Mary Barra, chief executive officer of General Motors (GM), speaks to reporters after a meeting with Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH) and Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) on Capitol Hill, December 5, 2018 in Washington, DC. GM is under fire for plans to cut around 8,000 salaried workers and 3,300 hourly workers in the United States. The plants currently slated to close are in Lordstown, Ohio, Detroit and Warren, Michigan and Baltimore. (Getty Images)

"We remain open to talking with all the affected stakeholders, but our main focus remains on our employees and offering them jobs in our plants where we have growth opportunities," company's statement added.

Ohio has a crucial voter base for the Republican who prevailed in the 2016 election in the state, and the win helped him garner enough electoral votes to become president despite losing the popular vote to his then political rival Hillary Clinton. This could be one of the reasons why Trump has joined a coalition of Ohio lawmakers in an attempt to get the Lordstown GM plant to open again. 

President Donald Trump speaks at a rally to show support for Ohio Republican congressional candidate Troy Balderson on August 4, 2018 in Lewis Center, Ohio. (Getty Images)
President Donald Trump speaks at a rally to show support for Ohio Republican congressional candidate Troy Balderson on August 4, 2018 in Lewis Center, Ohio. (Getty Images)

Trump, ever since he moved to the White House, has berated multiple US companies for not doing more to assist the country's economy. However, he has not taken any concrete actions on the issue. The Republican had also publicly called upon Apple to shift most of its manufacturing from China to the US, however, the firm continues to make most of its product overseas.

General Motors closed its Lordstown plant earlier this month as part of a massive reorganization. Over 16 million vehicles were made at the particular plant during its 53-year history until the plant was shut. The firm is also set to close four other such plants in North America by early next year, according to reports.

Although Ohio Governor Mike DeWine, last week, said that it was doubtful GM would reopen its Lordstown plant, the automaker suggested that it is in talks with another company about using the particular site for other projects.