Tool preview new music in tour promo video

Thanks to a promo video of Tool's upcoming 'music clinic' sessions, we finally have a first taste of what's to come on the prog-rockers much-anticipated album.


                            Tool preview new music in tour promo video

After a harrowing 12-year wait, we’re moving ever so closer to getting a new Tool album, which we firmly believe is still worth waiting for.

The band has spent the last month or so holed up in the studio recording the follow-up to their 2006 studio album, '10,000 Days.'

While there’s still no timetable for the album’s release, it appears the band slid a small audio preview into a promo video for their upcoming music clinic tour.

The tour features three-fourths of the band, drummer Danny Carey, guitarist Adam Jones and bassist Justin Chancellor, who, as per a press release, will “walk attendees through a handful of the band’s songs, from the process of writing them to playing them live. Audience members are encouraged to ask questions via an open discussion, as well as mingle with the band following the session.”

For the last couple of years, Tool have been playing a new song called 'Descending' live at their concerts. As CoS points out, what appears to be either a high-quality soundboard recording or demo studio version of the song soundtracks the promo video.

Check it out below:

Earlier this week, frontman Maynard James Keenan revealed that he had finished writing the lyrics and melodies to Tool’s new album.

“My work is done," Keenan wrote in a since-deleted tweet. “Waiting on them to track. Then I can finish. Can’t track to music that isn’t recorded.”

Keenan recently expressed his support for Jack White’s attempts to stop audiences from using their cellphones at concerts, and said that Tool were thinking about following White's lead by using a new method of preventing people from accessing their phones while they were in an auditorium.

While agreeing that artists’ material was being copied and replicated without any compensation to the creator, Keenan said there was a more important issue. “The more you’re tapped into that thing in front of you, the less you’re actually tapped into the experience around you,” he told Uproxx.

“I’m a strong believer, supporter, advocate of the aural tradition and there’s got to be better ways.