'The thought process was already there': Bryan Kohberger's education did not aid in murders, expert says

'The thought process was already there': Bryan Kohberger's education did not aid in murders, expert says
Famous lawyer and criminologist Casey Jordan reportedly said that Bryan Kohberger's education did not help him in committing the Idaho murders (Casey Jordan & Fox News YouTube Screenshot)

This is based on sources and we have been unable to verify this information independently.

MOSCOW, IDAHO: A famous lawyer and criminology professor believed that Idaho murder suspect Bryan Kohberger’s degree in criminology did not help him much if he had indeed committed these murders, and "the thought process was already there." Dr. Casey Jordan explained that it was unlikely that the murder suspect's education could have motivated him to kill. She reportedly said, "As a criminologist, I was shocked but not really surprised to find out that the accused was doing a PhD in criminology. I can guarantee that nothing he learned in his classes helped him, if indeed he did factually commit these crimes, to commit these crimes or try to get away with it.” 

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"The truth is, it wasn't his higher education that might have contributed to his thought process - we believe the thought process was already there,” Jordan said, speaking to King 5. On December 30, 2022, nearly seven weeks after the murders of Kaylee Goncalves, Madison Mogen, Xana Kernodle and Ethan Chapin, the 28-year-old student of Washington State University was apprehended at his parents' Pennsylvania home. 

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Kohberger was charged with four counts of first-degree murder and one count of burglary. He reportedly completed a master's program in criminal justice at DeSales University, a Catholic university in Center Valley, Pennsylvania, earlier in 2022.  He was a first-year PhD student and teaching assistant at WSU in Pullman, roughly 10 miles from the crime scene. He also studied there under renowned forensic psychologist Katherine Ramsland. 

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After Kohberger was arrested, it came to light that he posted online ads on Reddit for ex-offenders to engage in a study project. He told potential participants he was interested in "how emotions and psychological traits influence decision-making when committing a crime," in addition to how they prepared to carry out their crimes, and how a person approached their target before "making your move."

After the arrest, Kohberger reportedly told his former attorney Jason LaBar that he was "eager to be exonerated." During the recent status hearing on January 12, Kohberger gave his consent to waive his right to an early preliminary hearing. The murder scene will stay closed until February 1 to allow the defense to gather more proof to support the suspect's defense. 

Disclaimer : This is based on sources and we have been unable to verify this information independently.

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