Blood Moon Rising: How and where to watch ominous ELECTION DAY lunar eclipse

The moon will appear red as only the sunlight traveling through our planet's atmosphere will be able to reach the lunar surface

Blood Moon Rising: How and where to watch ominous ELECTION DAY lunar eclipse
A Total Lunar Eclipse of the moon is seen on May 26, 2021 in Auckland, New Zealand (Photo by Phil Walter/Getty Images)
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NEW YORK CITY, NEW YORK: On Election Day next Tuesday, November 8, an ominous crimson moon will rise just before the polls open and will be visible in regions of North, Central, and South America. The moon will appear redder on November 8 as only the sunlight that travels through our planet's atmosphere will be able to reach the lunar surface during this cosmic event, which will take place when the sun, Earth, and moon perfectly align. This is the last lunar eclipse until 2025, so skywatchers would not want to miss it when it reaches full totality, or when the moon is completely in the Earth's shadow, at 5:50 am ET.

According to NASA's solar system blog, "The moon doesn't revolve in the exact same plane as the sun and Earth do." The two times a year that they line up is referred to as eclipse season. The likelihood that the moon will pass between our planet and the neighbouring star for a solar eclipse or that the Earth will block out the moon for a lunar eclipse increases during an eclipse season when the moon is essentially buzzing around between us and the sun. Usually two to three eclipses occur in less than a 37-day period during eclipse seasons.

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In addition to Ecuador, Colombia, and the western regions of Venezuela and Peru, totality will be visible over North and Central America. While the eclipse will be partially visible in Asia, Australia, and New Zealand, the moon may not appear as red. The moon will enter the outer reaches of Earth's shadow at 3:02 am ET and then begin to fade. This is the beginning of the process leading up to the blood moon. The moon slides deeper into our planet's shadow, seeming as though a bite has been ripped out of its surface, and one hour and seven minutes later the partial eclipse starts.

Although binoculars or a telescope can improve the experience, it's safe to see with the naked eye because this type of eclipse doesn't require looking directly at the sun. To endure the early morning chill, you'll primarily need clear skies and warm clothing. As the sun, Earth, and moon are all aligned during an eclipse, a large portion of the light travelling around our globe to illuminate the moon must necessarily pass through our atmosphere, which results in the scattering that gives the moon its reddish tint. Thus, the bleeding red moon.

If you are unable to experience this eclipse in person, the next eclipse season is scheduled for April 2023.

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