Cats and dogs are being fed to death by their 'caring' owners, reveal latest reports on diabetes in pets

According to latest reports, around 30,000 dogs and 55,000 cats in the UK are battling with the life-threatening disease, and at least 10 percent of these pets have to be put down.


                            Cats and dogs are being fed to death by their 'caring' owners, reveal latest reports on diabetes in pets

Diabetes is increasingly becoming one of the biggest health threats across the world, causing health services billions of dollars in prescription alone. Reports state that now the epidemic is spreading among pets too, along with soaring levels of obesity.

According to latest reports, around 30,000 dogs and 55,000 cats in the UK are battling with the life-threatening disease, and at least 10 percent of these pets have to be put down as owners are unable to maintain their pets' insulin levels.

The veterinary charity The People's Dispensary For Sick Animals, reportedly said that almost half of all dogs and a third of cats seen by vets in the country are classified.
The veterinary charity The People's Dispensary For Sick Animals, reportedly said that almost half of all dogs and a third of cats seen by vets in the country are classified.

Most of these pets are afflicted with type 2 diabetes, and similar to humans, it occurs largely because of poor diet and lack of exercise. Reports state that the owners of pets with the disease are being accused of indulging their animals with unsuitable foods or failing to take their canines on long walks sufficient enough for their daily exercise requirements.

The veterinary charity The People's Dispensary For Sick Animals, reportedly said that almost half of all dogs and a third of cats seen by vets in the country are classified as obese or overweight, according to the Daily Mail.

"Pets who are the right weight are less likely to develop diabetes," Nurse Kristina Shirley said. "Many owners don’t know whether their pet is overweight. We work hard to encourage owners to feed their animals a balanced, age and activity appropriate diet and weigh out their food to avoid excess weight gain."



 

A Plymouth animal shelter, recently, took in what they described as "Britain's fattest dog". Reports state that the dog, an 11-year-old collie, was twice the healthy weight and too big to fit into a kennel. The canine is now being monitored by vets for diabetes and has been put on a special exercise regime and diet to improve his condition.

RSPCA chief veterinary officer Caroline Allen said: "Sadly we do see a growing rise in pets with obesity-related problems such as diabetes. This is mostly a result of their lifestyle, including diet and exercise."