Teen violin prodigy dies after ODing on 'Calvin Klein' drug which has become popular because of its 'sexy' name

Calvin reportedly stands for cocaine and Klein refers to ketamine present in the mixture, and the cocktail of drugs "wreaks havoc on the brain’s chemical system."


                            Teen violin prodigy dies after ODing on 'Calvin Klein' drug which has become popular because of its 'sexy' name

A deadly combination of party drugs, popularly known as "Calvin Klien" has claimed the life of a 17-year-old violin prodigy from London who died after taking the lethal cocktail of chemicals involving ketamine and cocaine.

The victim was identified as Katya Tsukanova, who was found unresponsive at her house from an apparent overdose.

A site dedicated to treating ketamine substance abuse warned of "Calvin Klein" binges, stating that the cocktail of drugs "wreaks havoc on the brain’s chemical system and can greatly impair overall brain functioning."

Calvin reportedly stands for cocaine and Klein refers to ketamine present in the mixture. Reports state that the party drug produces a euphoric high, similar to ecstasy, according to users.

The deadly mix has reportedly become "popular among young drug abusers" and has been linked with an "increased risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection,” according to the US National Center for Biotechnology Information. The drug's link to HIV was stated in a study, which did not provide an explanation for the association.

Tsukanova reportedly collapsed to her death on June 18 at her home in Kensington from an apparent overdose and was found unresponsive by her father at their mansion in west London. The teenager has reportedly performed at the Royal Opera House just days before her tragic death. Tsukanova's family is now warning others about the drugs' craze and its lethal effect, according to Telegraph.

Her Russian billionaire father, Igor Tsukanov, said that his daughter was a "smart girl, and she made one bad choice" as the drug’s popularity continues to increase among youngsters. Tsukanov was reportedly accepted at the prestigious Royal College of Music at the age of 9, where she took classes in violin, piano, music theory, and playing in a trio and orchestra.

"What can we parents do? The children will do what they want anyway, and they never tell you the truth," the father told the outlet. The teenager's friend, who reportedly asked to remain anonymous, said that the drug cocktail was the "new thing among Katya and her friends. Not just them, though — it’s everywhere."

The drugs have created a furore over social media, especially in the wake of the violinist's death, with many speculating whether the drugs' "sexy name" has contributed to its popularity among the youth. 

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