Expect a surge in serial killers in the next 15 years: Author Peter Vronsky delivers chilling warning

The reason behind the abundance of serial killers in this period may have to do with a "hidden surge of war-traumatized fathers" returned home from war zones


                            Expect a surge in serial killers in the next 15 years: Author Peter Vronsky delivers chilling warning

There could be a surge in the number of serial killers in the next 10 to 15 years in the United States, according to author Peter Vronsky, whose third book on serial killers is soon coming out. The book titled 'Sons of Cain: A History of Serial Killers from the Stone Age to the Present' reportedly indexes nearly 17,000 years of homicidal maniacs, from Cain to Jack the Ripper to the Green River Killer.

Vronsky, in his book, has also hypothesized that a "broken generation" of soldiers returning from World War II birthed the "golden age" of serial killers in America.

The author has also researched for varied reasons for what led to an enormous number of serial killers between 1950 and 2000, according to the New York Post.

And the reason behind the abundance of serial killers in this period may have to do with a "hidden surge of war-traumatized fathers" returned home from war zones in Europe and Pacific, according to Vronsky, who is an investigative historian and teaches history at Ryerson University in Toronto. The author says that these soldiers who witnessed atrocities in the battlefield spawned a generation of emotionally crippled murderers.

While talking to The Post about his latest book, Vronsky said serial killers are formed "very early in their life, often as early as (the age of) five." He says that the formation of a serial killer is a childhood process and that the average age for a serial killer when they first kill is approximately 28. 

Vronsky says that when he was researching about the so-called "golden age" of serial killers, he found one thing in common in nearly all of the murderers and that was they all were either raised during the Second World War of immediately after the Second World War in the Cold War period. He adds that the family of a person is crucial in their road to becoming a killer. In his book, the author closely looked at their fathers and what might have traumatized them.



The author then talks about the atrocities a section of American soldiers perpetrated in these wars, including rape of women, murders, and even necrophilia. He admits not all our war heroes were perpetrators but adds that all of them witnessed the savagery being committed during the "wars of destruction."

Vronsky then adds that according to his research, most of these soldiers ended up traumatizing their own children when they returned from war zones, by either leaving them, abusing them or just being emotionally withdrawn from them.

He then talks about other reasons which led to the surge in serial killers, which includes popular true detective and men's adventure magazines at the time.

"They celebrated the bondage of women, the torture of women in every cover. Each one always had a woman who was bound in a disheveled state, often looking off the cover of the magazine towards the viewer. So it’s almost as if the person who’s looking at the magazine cover is the one who’s about to perpetrate the crime against the figure in the magazine. So it essentially put you in the killer’s mind," Vronsky says.

The author then talks about today's generation and says that there is a probability that the crash of 2008 would also result in a similar surge of killers in the next 20-25 years. He says that the economic difficulties changed a lot of families across the world.

"So when we start talking to those serial killers, the stories we might hear is: 'We were living as a family in a home and come 2008, my dad committed suicide. My dad lost his job. He became a drug addict. He was an alcoholic. He was never the same. He lost his pride and I lost my dad.' That may be the emerging narrative," Vronsky told The Post.