Sony admits that posthumous Michael Jackson album, 'Michael', does not actually feature the King of Pop at all

After multiple charges against releasing an entire album of fake King of Pop songs, the company has finally to falsely labelling the new album to Michael Jackson.


                            Sony admits that posthumous Michael Jackson album, 'Michael', does not actually feature the King of Pop at all

Sony has admitted that the songs on the album 'Michael', which was released posthumously in 2010, were fake. The three songs in the album, which debuted at number three on the Billboard 200 with first-week sales rising up to 228,000 units ('Breaking News', 'Keep Your Head Up', and 'Monster'), were speculated to have been "imitations" of the original Michael Jackson tracks. 

Fan Vera Sarova allegedly stated that the songs on the album were actually sung by Jason Malachi. The authenticity of the songs, allegedly written by Michael's longtime friend, Eddie Cascio and James Porte, was very much in question when fans became suspicious as they lacked Michael's signature foot taps and finger snaps. Also, a 41-page report by a forensic audiologist, Doctor George Papcun, suggests that the songs were certainly not sung by the 'Thriller' singer. While Vera's claim was supported by Michael's mother, Katherine Jackson, it also sparked several controversies over the voice on the songs. 

Katherine Jackson supported the fan's claim about the songs being fake. (Getty Images)
Katherine Jackson supported the fan's claim about the songs being fake. (Getty Images)

Malachi initially denied any allegations about him being the singer on the songs. However, the 'Mamacita' artist, who became popular for the uncanny resemblance his voice had to the King of Pop, soon confessed on a now-deleted-Facebook post that he was responsible for pastiching Michael's voice.

He wrote: "Sheesh guys, I guess it's time to confess. I've lied to many people, including someone today, but... It was me. It was me who sang Breaking News, Keep Your Head Up, Monster and Stay. I had an agreement with the record company, but now the cat is out of the bag. Sorry to all my fans, and fellow Michael Jackson fans."

Listen to his song from the album below:

By December 2016, lawyers for Sony Music also stated that the songs might actually be fake. They, however, defended the company claiming that it had put its trust in Eddie and James, and had not conducted its own investigation.

Zia Modabber, Sony's lawyer, blamed it entirely on Eddie and James, claiming that they "failed to disclose to Sony or the Estate that Michael Jackson did not provide the lead vocals". On August 21, the company finally stated during an argument at the California Court of Appeal that the three tracks were indeed sung by an impersonator. However, it asserted that it held the right to sell songs as Jackson's own, even in the absence of the singer. 

The Court of Appeals has yet to decide if the case should be dismissed and whether the sale of the fraud album should be allowed, or if they should remain as defendants in the case. While the case against Eddie and James, as presented in the court document by Vera, remains strong, the court is prioritizing its decision regarding the company's involvement. If Sony's involvement is considered "non-commercial speech", then the company will be let off as defendants, while the case with Eddie and James, who had apparently cheated the company claiming the songs to be original, will move further.