Consuming marijuana impairs the ability to learn or make new memories for 24 hours: Study

For the study, University of Alberta researchers tested memory, learning and verbal abilities of 120 youngsters who frequently smoked up before and after they used cannabis


                            Consuming marijuana impairs the ability to learn or make new memories for 24 hours: Study

For anyone who has gotten way too high and wanted to know how long the effects will last, scientists have finally found the answer.

According to DailyMail, researchers at University of Alberta have recently discovered that getting high impairs learning for up to 24 hours and that the effects fully vanish only three days after consumption.

The researchers believe this study can be a starting point to form adequate policies around the substance (Pexels)
The researchers believe this study can be a starting point to form adequate policies around the substance (Pexels)

Canada recently joined a growing number of countries where recreational use of cannabis is legal. The researchers believe this study can be a starting point to form adequate policies around the substance. 

Lead study author Dr Scot Purdon told DailyMail that Canada had been preparing for their nationwide cannabis legalization for the past year. They have had their eye on US states like Colorado, California and Washington and have been taking notes and learning from all their successes and mistakes. "But marijuana's cognitive effects are more complicated and subtle than those from alcohol, and we don't yet have a particularly good way to test, for example, drivers for it," Purdon revealed. He said it is his mission right now to figure out what cannabis does to one's brain and for how long. 

"We know that cannabis can have very significant psychological and cognitive effects," Purdon revealed. He added that his team decided to test memory, learning and verbal abilities of 120 youngsters who frequently smoke up and tested the students' verbal learning and fluency before and after they used cannabis. 

A woman smokes a cigarette of marijuana in an Amsterdam cafe on February 7, 2007 in Amsterdam, Netherlands. The city council in Amsterdam has recently voted in favour of introducing a citywide ban on smoking marijuana in public areas. A successful trial ban in the De Baarsjes district of Amsterdam has been declared a success after a reduction in anti social behaviour. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
A woman smokes a cigarette of marijuana in an Amsterdam cafe on February 7, 2007 in Amsterdam, Netherlands. The city council in Amsterdam has recently voted in favour of introducing a citywide ban on smoking marijuana in public areas. A successful trial ban in the De Baarsjes district of Amsterdam has been declared a success after a reduction in anti social behaviour. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

The results showed that the subjects who used cannabis struggled with these tests just hours following consumption, and some still made mistakes 48 hours later that they wouldn't make if sober. But after 72 hours, the performance was back to the normal baseline. This led Purdon to deduce that 72 hours would be ample time limit for people to return to their jobs.

He later revealed that this research also clarified that consumption of cannabis helped people focus better. "A lot of people tell us it's a positive thing [for concentration], but the data don't always bear that out," he said. "[High] people don't have the distractability that might be necessary in day-to-day functioning. You get so focused on A that you don't notice B, C and D around you." 

Purdon believes Canada's legalization of cannabis is like an experiment on 33 million people. He hopes that, now that it is legal, people will have more control over it and its potency along with an idea about how high is too high and how long it will last.