26-year-old mystery finally solved as divers make STARTLING discovery near Titanic wreckage site

The Titanic currently lies submerged at the bottom of the Atlantic, 400 nautical miles from Canada's Newfoundland

26-year-old mystery finally solved as divers make STARTLING discovery near Titanic wreckage site
Divers explored the shipwrecked Titanic to solve a 26-year-old mystery (screenshot/OceanGate Expeditions/YouTube)
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NEWFOUNDLAND, CANADA: Just a few meters from where the Titanic wreckage was discovered, divers found a dense and healthy environment. PH Nargeolet, a seasoned Nautile pilot and well-known Titanic diver, made a perplexing sonar discovery to solve a 26-year-old mystery while scanning the region near the 1912 shipwreck.

Following that, Nargeolet contemplated the radar location for the greater part of two decades, spending countless hours pondering if what he had seen was a shipwreck or a natural formation. On October 25, nevertheless, he finally discovered the solution to his unsolvable conundrum. When Nargeolet swam to the intended location, he realized that the target was actually a volcanic reef. The study was financed by OceanGate Expeditions specialist Oisin Fanning and the scientific team of the foundation who provided the information on the sinking of the legendary ship. The group published a recording of the region which showed the sponges, coral, and marine life nearby the reef.

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Signs of coral and marine life are visible near the Titanic wreckage site near Newfoundland, Canada (Photo credit screenshot OceanGate Expiditions / YouTube)
Signs of coral and marine life are visible near the Titanic wreckage site near Newfoundland, Canada (screenshot/OceanGate Expeditions/YouTube)

According to reports, the location is close to the Titanic wreck and has a "natural abyssal deep sea reef of extraordinary biodiversity at 2,900 meters.” “We didn’t know what we would discover,” Nargeolet told Jam Press. “On the sonar, this could have been any number of things including the potential of it being another shipwreck. I’ve been seeking the chance to explore this large object that appeared on sonar so long ago,” he continued. “It was amazing to explore this area and find this fascinating volcanic formation teeming with so much life.” After colliding with an iceberg on April 15, 1912, the Titanic eventually drowned and currently lies submerged at the bottom of the Atlantic, 400 nautical miles from Canada's Newfoundland.

OceanGate is currently studying the video of the volcanic reef to find out more information. “The apparently basalt volcanic formations are remarkable, and we are astonished at the diversity and density of the sponges, bamboo corals, other cold-water corals, squat lobsters and fishes that are thriving at 2,900 meters deep in the North Atlantic Ocean,” OceanGate's principal scientist Steve W Ross explained. “Uncovering this previously unknown ecosystem also provides an opportunity to make a comparison to the marine biology on and around the Titanic,” he added. The discovery will "improve the way we think about biodiversity of the abyss," according to Ross as reported by New York Post.

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As per Ross' expertise "the variety of lifeforms, concentration of life and the overall ecosystems may differ between the deep artificial reef of the Titanic and this newly revealed, natural deep ocean reef.” “The similarities and differences will help us better understand our deep-sea environments,” he added.

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