'See' Review: The dystopian drama borders between amazing and ridiculous, but boasts of a riveting tale, a strong cast and pulls no punches

Along with 'See' come a few shows with some big names, but for Momoa's fans, 'See' has more to offer than just his gargantuan physique, his primal cries, and the eye-catching set details. In fact, His presence isn't the only thing that'll make 'See' sell


                            'See' Review: The dystopian drama borders between amazing and ridiculous, but boasts of a riveting tale, a strong cast and pulls no punches

This review contains spoilers for 'See' 

'See' doesn't take much time to explain its premise. For a viewer, what is important is that the series is set hundreds of years in the future. However, life for the survivors has gone back to that of the dark ages after a 21st Century virus wipes out millions.

Not only are the survivors blind, their descendants too have emerged the same way in a world where vision is a myth. 

The focus shifts to a blind woman, Maghra (Hera Hilmar ) who gives birth to two children while a bloody battle rages on a few clicks from where she is. Leading the army is  Baba Voss (Jason Momoa)— a character who is hard to describe.

Fearsome, herculean, braided and scarred, Momoa leads the Alkeny community to war against the Witchfinders, but beats a hasty retreat when they realize they are outgunned, or in this case, outclubbed.

This attack establishes that there is a Judas in the mix.  It is also revealed that the babies are not those of Voss, but of a traveling prophet named Jerlamarel (Joshua Henry) being hunted for preaching about sight and the lifeline it could offer humanity — a big no-no in this post-apocalyptic world.

Call 'See' dystopian, fantasy-filled or even ridiculous, but the tale is strong and pulls no punches. This is a story of delicate relationships and it brings with it some bloody violence. The brutality is old-school and gory.

Blood and blows are splattered generously, but it only adds to the narrative. In Sylvia Hoeks is a queen who serves as the antagonist and her introduction is possibly the strangest.

Her palace is within a dam, and her prayers are done while she masturbates climaxing at the same time she finishes her prayer. 

Fearsome, herculean, braided and scarred. (IMDb)

Her introduction is followed by an episode-long battle that sees the Alkeny tribe eventually head over to a new land, which is also their new home.

The attention to detail is simply sensational as the rustic and tribal elements are recreated to point.

There are subtle digs about plastic that are still out there in the form of bottles. This is a gentle reminder of how the material takes eons to degrade. Communication too isn't using any gadgetry, rather crude ropes with specific knots. This just makes the story a lot more believable. 

Performances take center stage in 'See' and complements the world-building seamlessly. This is a series that depends on the cast should the tale fall short at some point.

Momoa, Hilmar, and Hoeks shine in their roles. Credit to Momoa as he plays the warrior with a heart of gold. His Voss is a man who is not read and has trouble expressing emotion, but what he is strong and passionate about is his family, as well as the bond with his tribe and people. 

For some, this series may come across as expensively made and downright absurd, thanks to certain elements. There are instances that give the viewers a feel like the survivors may be blind but have super developed senses otherwise.

Their ability to hear, detect emotions accurately and fight with some slick casts a cloud on a gritty, but amazing action sequence. This may probably see some turn away as they would find it ridiculous, but in all fairness, this series needs to be given time.

'See' has its challenges and weaknesses to combat, but the three episodes that have been released as part of Apple TV +'s launch makes it an intriguing and compelling watch.

Along with 'See' come a few shows with some big names, but for Momoa's fans, 'See' has more to offer than just his gargantuan physique, his primal cries, and the eye-catching set details. In fact, his presence isn't the only thing that'll make 'See' sell. 

'See' is available for streaming on Apple TV+.

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