Sleeping for more than 8 hours each night increases chances of early death, says new study

The study points out that there is already a high possibility that people who are found to be sleeping too much are suffering from undiagnosed problems in their daily life


                            Sleeping for more than 8 hours each night increases chances of early death, says new study

For all those people who have a constant love-hate relationship with sleep, and prefer spending more time sleeping than keeping awake, there's some bad news for you. According to a recent study, people who tend to sleep for more than the standard 8 hours have greater risk of dying early than those who sleep less.

The study, which involved more than 3.3 million people around the world, also found out that sleeping for too long raised the risk of heart disease and strokes, reports the Daily Mail.

A Chinese shopper sleeps on a bed in the showroom of the IKEA store in Beijing, China.  stores are designed with extra room displays given the tendency for customers to make a visit an all-day affair. Store management does not discourage shoppers from sleeping on Ikea furniture, even marking them with signs inviting customers to try them out.
A Chinese shopper sleeps on a bed in the showroom of the IKEA store in Beijing, China. The study was conducted by scientists from the universities of Keele, Manchester, Leeds and East Anglia, and is a combination of the results of 74 previous studies.

It said that excessive sleep among individuals should ideally be considered as a sign of poor health.

The lowest risk was shown for those who slept between seven and eight hours per day, the researchers said. For people who got less sleep, the risk of disease and death rose gradually, but not enough to be statistically significant.

According to the study, those who slept for nine hours a night had a 14 per cent increased mortality risk; the risk for those who got 10 hours went up 30 per cent; and those who slept for 11 hours were 47 per cent more likely to die an early death.

People who got 10 hours or more were also at a 56 per cent increased risk of dying from a stroke and 49 per cent increased risk of dying from cardiovascular disease.

The study was published in the Journal of the American Heart Association. It further said that people getting too much sleep tend to exercise less, which in turn raises their risk of heart problems.

However, there is already a high possibility that people who are found to be sleeping too much are suffering from undiagnosed problems in their daily life. "Long sleep duration may be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease because of ... comorbidities that lead to fatigue, such as chronic inflammatory disorders and anaemia," the study said.

(CHINA OUT) A child sleeps outdoors in a square in an attempt to avoid the effects of any earthquke aftershocks on May 20, 2008 in Deyang of Sichuan Province, China. Thousands of Chinese have taken to sleeping outside on the streets and in parks after a major earthquake measuring 8.0 on the Richter scale, the worst in 58 years, jolted China's Sichuan Province May 12. The death toll is now estimated at over 34,000 people and is expected to rise, as 100,000 military troops continue rescue operations.
(CHINA OUT) A child sleeps outdoors in a square in an attempt to avoid the effects of any earthquke aftershocks on May 20, 2008 in Deyang of Sichuan Province, China. Thousands of Chinese have taken to sleeping outside on the streets and in parks after a major earthquake measuring 8.0 on the Richter scale, the worst in 58 years, jolted China's Sichuan Province May 12. The death toll is now estimated at over 34,000 people and is expected to rise, as 100,000 military troops continue rescue operations.

"Depressive symptoms, low socioeconomic status, unemployment and low physical activity are also associated with long sleep duration." The researchers also mentioned the importance of doctors screening their patients who are sleeping for a long time each night for heart problems.

Lead researcher Dr. Chun Shing Kwok of Keele University said: "Our study has an important public health impact in that it shows that excessive sleep is a marker of elevated cardiovascular risk. Our findings have important implications as clinicians should have greater consideration for exploring sleep duration and quality during consultations."

Students practice the unique Bikram Yoga at the City Studio, on March 13, 2007 in London, England. The Bikram Yoga, also known as Hot Yoga, is a style of yoga developed by Bikram Choudhury and is done in a room heated to 105?F (40.5?C), this helps stretching, prevents injury and makes the body sweat which aids detoxification. The class normally involves two breathing exercises and 26 postures in a 90 minute class.
Students practice the unique Bikram Yoga at the City Studio, on March 13, 2007 in London, England. The Bikram Yoga, also known as Hot Yoga, is a style of yoga developed by Bikram Choudhury and is done in a room heated to 105?F (40.5?C), this helps stretching, prevents injury and makes the body sweat which aids detoxification. The class normally involves two breathing exercises and 26 postures in a 90 minute class.

"If excessive sleep patterns are found, particularly prolonged durations of eight hours or more, then clinicians should consider screening for adverse cardiovascular risk factors and obstructive sleep apnoea, which is a serious sleep disorder that occurs when a person’s breathing is interrupted during sleep."

Australian Cricketer David Warner sleeps next to his Baggy Green Cap and a replica Ashes Urn at his home on January 6, 2014 in Sydney, Australia. Australia yesterday claimed a five-nil Ashes series victory over England in which Warner was leading run scorer.
Australian Cricketer David Warner sleeps next to his Baggy Green Cap and a replica Ashes Urn at his home on January 6, 2014 in Sydney, Australia. Australia yesterday claimed a five-nil Ashes series victory over England in which Warner was leading run scorer.

Dr. Kwok added: "The important message is that abnormal sleep is a marker of elevated cardiovascular risk and greater consideration should be given in exploring both duration and sleep quality during patient consultations. Sleep affects everyone."

"The amount and quality of our sleep is complex. There are cultural, social, psychological, behavioural, pathophysiological and environmental influences on our sleep such as the need to care for children or family members, irregular working shift patterns, physical or mental illness, and the 24-hour availability of commodities in modern society."

A boy naps during nap time at Torez Special Secondary boarding school #43 on February 27, 2015 in Torez, Ukraine. The school acts as both a school for local children and an orphanage for children who no longer have a place to live. The school receives assistant from pro-Russian rebels. Eastern Ukraine has seen sporadic fighting between the Ukrainian Army and pro-Russian rebels for the past year, killing over 5,000 people.
A boy naps during nap time at Torez Special Secondary boarding school #43 on February 27, 2015 in Torez, Ukraine. The school acts as both a school for local children and an orphanage for children who no longer have a place to live. The school receives assistant from pro-Russian rebels. Eastern Ukraine has seen sporadic fighting between the Ukrainian Army and pro-Russian rebels for the past year, killing over 5,000 people.

 

Disclaimer : This article is for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.