'Sally4Ever' Episode 2 review: Lesbian dark comedy features scissoring and we aren't the only ones dumbfounded

Nothing is off-limits for Julia Davis and her character Emma, as the wildest sex scene takes place in the most cringiest of circumstances


                            'Sally4Ever' Episode 2 review: Lesbian dark comedy features scissoring and we aren't the only ones dumbfounded

This article contains spoilers from 'Sally4Ever' episode 2.

From toeing in the butt to dusters and feathers caressing the genitals, we thought we had seen all the intricacies of the steamiest lesbian sex on TV with the premiere of HBO's 'Sally4Ever.' But we couldn't have been more wrong.

Episode two of Julia Davis' British-import dark comedy featured the wildest sex scene in the most baffling scenario imaginable. Picking up from the pilot, where Sally's boyfriend of 10 years, David, is kicked out of the house and Emma, the bohemian singer and Sally's new romantic partner has moved in, the episode was bound to explore the entry of the new storm aka Emma and the ruins of the old destroyed relationship of that with David.

It's Sally's birthday and her milquetoast ex drops by her doorstep to give her flowers, chocolates, and a birthday card. Too bad, Emma sees it and in the blink of an eye, the card is torn into pieces and the bouquet of flowers is tossed into the bin. What comes next is the realization that Emma is shocking beyond belief; a selfish and scheming character.

Talk about scratching Sally's dead grandmother's table with a compass and showing no remorse whatsoever of destroying someone's property, flirting with a director right in the presence of his wife and Sally just so she can secure a role, unapologetically letting Sally's parents know she is gay and making Sally late for her work by wanting to have sex with her when she ought to be on her way to work.

All of this is not even half her evil wrongdoings because the major victim of Emma's vindictiveness is David, and in this episode, his mother..., his recently widowed mother. In the most awkward dining conversation and movie time, David gets a call that his father has passed away. The whiny David, as we know him to be, cannot stop crying and as remorseful as Sally is towards him and his loss, Emma is mostly annoyed and questions if she should pause the movie.

She invites her own self to David's house as David and Sally get into the car to head to his house. David breaks it to Sally that his mother does not know about their break up and it's best if she does not because she recently lost her husband. Fair enough, as this is understandable. But, not to Emma.

At a very modest English home, the old mother narrates how her husband died by hanging and all the sorrow experienced. Davis' genius in nailing a sad, bad and remorseful situation, and turning it into a humorous situation, where you actually feel guilty about laughing, is on display and I actually had to take a break before proceeding into the explicit sex scene. No, not because I wasn't interested, but because the situation was so damn cringe-worthy, I was scared to even proceed.



 

As David and Sally go to bed together and Emma is given the guest room that she tells David's mother is "too small" for her to spread her legs and sleep, the widow nicely tells her to adjust and make-do. Later, Sally walks into the room and forgets to lock the door. Sally makes a straight point to Emma that having sex in her ex's mother-in-law's house, who recently lost her husband, is out of the question.

But nothing is off-limits to Emma, or to Davis, who plays Emma. So, brace yourself, David's old mother, who still believes Sally is engaged to her son, sees full-throttle vigorous lesbian sex, this time the position is Scissoring. As moans grow louder echoing through the narrow wooden corridors, the old lady cannot believe her eyes - she turns back three times to ensure what she's looking at is really happening (she may be a bit curious too), especially just hours after her husband's demise. 

With jaws wide open, David's mom goes to bed and while it's extremely funny, we fear she may have died because of the shock. Thank goodness she has not and David isn't an orphan. As her eyes widen and she is dumbfounded, literally, the doctor explains his mother is thrown into trauma, and she can barely function.

When questioned further, the silent old lady demonstrates with her fingers to describe what she saw last night by hand-gesturing the scissoring and giving the middle-finger to Emma. However, neither the doctor nor David nor Sally nor Emma understand her communication, so her gestures are dismissed as fits.

As credits roll, we are laughing, but personally, my conscience stings because I am laughing at the fate of a poor old lady in a difficult situation in life. As The New York Times puts it, "There is comedy, and then there is dark comedy, and then there is Julia Davis’s comedy." I think I just have to get used to it, a guilty-laugh will be a thing soon.

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