'Sally4Ever': Emma isn't the darkest of comedy villains Julia Davis has created, it's Jill Tyrell from 'Nighty Night'

HBO's 'Sally4Ever' may make you think Emma is the worst character on TV with her narcissistic and outrageous actions, but the creator Julia Davis affirms she has created worse


                            'Sally4Ever': Emma isn't the darkest of comedy villains Julia Davis has created, it's Jill Tyrell from 'Nighty Night'

Emma from HBO's 'Sally4Ever' may be the reigning dark comedy villain on TV because she's so cringe-worthy, evil and manipulative in the most realistic sense. At first, Emma comes off as an attractive woman who aspires to be a bohemian singer and an actress, and in no time sweeps Sally off her feet. There's a sigh of relief when Emma's character is introduced because we feel it's such a silver lining at a time when her whiny and milquetoast fiance, David, is making Sally's dull life even duller.

But as the episodes progress, Emma turns to be the most unreasonable character who is no doubt a pathological liar besides being sheer evil. Despite Sally realizing how toxic Emma is to her, both in terms of her personal and professional life, Sally becomes helpless in the colossal presence of Emma's pretentious behavior.

For instance, when Emma performs cunnilingus on Sally when she is clearly late for work, Sally pushes her away. Emma stamps her foot in rage and kicks Sally and instantly pretends she did not do it. In the latest episode, Emma offers to have coprophilic sex with the director of a film in exchange for a minor movie role and eventually gets busted in the most awkward scene as Sally and the director's wife and daughter walk in.

Emma is played by Julia Davis, the British comedian who is the queen of dark comedy. She is also the writer of the show while British actress Catherine Shepherd plays the role of Sally. 'Sally4Ever' landed on American shores November 11, but Davis is also the creator of other dark villains Americans are vaguely aware of especially with regards to the new show 'Camping.'

Lena Dunham's 'Camping' is the U.S adaptation of Julia Davis' U.K version of the same name. The original antagonist of 'Camping' featured a selfish nymphomaniac named Fay. Then we had a malevolent housekeeper, Dorothy in Sky Atlantic's 'Hunderby.'

However, out of the plethora of evil characters Davis has conjured, the most outrageous stands to be a narcissistic sociopath beauty parlor owner, Jill Tyrrell, who Davis created in 2004 on BBC's dark comedy 'Nighty Night.' The 52-year-old comedian, writer, and actress who is responsible for giving us wild TV characters, sat down for an exclusive interview with Meaww and humorously told us about how she comes across such baffling characters.

One of Davis' first dark comedies that she penned and starred in, 'Nighty Night,' followed Jill Tyrell (played by Davis) alongside her moronic, asthmatic assistant Linda. When Jill learns that husband Terry has cancer, she uses that as an excuse to seduce the husband of her multiple sclerosis suffering neighbor, Cathy Cole, who is wheelchair bound. "Jill is so unbelievably brash and brutal," shared Davis. "But again, in a cartoonish world," she added quickly. 

Julia Davis (R) winner of the Writing Award at the Sky Women In Film & TV Awards at London Hilton on December 2, 2016 in London, England.
Julia Davis (R) winner of the Writing Award at the Sky Women In Film & TV Awards at London Hilton on December 2, 2016 in London, England.

Davis admitted the characters she has created to date are inspired from people she has met in real life. "I have definitely met people who echo all the characters so far. Sometimes I can't believe how pushy they are or how selfish and narcissistic they can get," said Davis. "However, I could have condensed those facets of people's personalities into a more, kinda, strong flavor," she added.

Concluding our short conversation, Davis warned the "most dangerous characters are the ones that are hidden." Even before I could confirm what she was hinting at, my time was up. However, at least one thing's certain now, Emma isn't the vilest character, and no matter how atrocious she gets, there's comfort in the fact that Jill existed, even if it was across the seven seas.