'Who is America?': Sacha Baron Cohen's new Showtime series sees the comedian back to his scathing best

In his new Showtime series 'Who is America?', in true old Cohen fashion he slips into the skin of an ally of whatever person he’s trying to hoodwink into going on a outlandish bing


                            'Who is America?': Sacha Baron Cohen's new Showtime series sees the comedian back to his scathing best

Those of you unfamiliar with the Sacha Baron Cohen's MO in his work that centers around movies ladened with absurd alter ego’s who derive sadistic pleasure out of interacting, interviewing people, culminating in hilarious parodies, should know that his new show is no different.


In his new Showtime series 'Who is America?', in true old Cohen fashion, he does what he does best. He quite efficiently slips into the skin of an ally of whatever person he’s trying to hoodwink into, going on an outlandish binge with him, to keep sufficient laughs rolling in and ensure the audience interest doesn’t wane.

Actor Sacha Baron Cohen attends the 88th Annual Academy Awards at Hollywood & Highland Center on February 28, 2016 in Hollywood, California.
Actor Sacha Baron Cohen attends the 88th Annual Academy Awards at Hollywood & Highland Center on February 28, 2016 in Hollywood, California.

 

While the show resonates with the aspects of his previous work, it does diverge from his usual shenanigans in one respect. This time around he’s showcasing a new character in 15 years.

Baron, who wrote and directed the seven-episode half-hour series, will explore the colorful individuals who inhabit America, who also wields a certain power over the masses. So expect to see a lot of sketchy satires in the realm of politics and entertainment.

In the half an hour series, Cohen uses his gimmicks with a fervor he usually laces in all his performances. However in the four-pronged episode, where he inhabits various alter ego’s and tries to convince people to go on an outrageous bender with him, works quite effectively at times but more often than not is rendered ineffective. However, if you’ve been waiting for the Cohen wagon to drop his hilarious wares on your doorstep, this show will keep you entertained regardless of its inconsistencies.

One segment in particular in the show delivers a barrel of laughs. We’d say it's worth a watch just to witness the hilarity that ensues as Cohen plays Col. Erran Morad -the terrorist terminator - out to vanquish the gun violence that’s been plaguing the schools of America, by pitching a program called ‘Kinderguardians” to arms the kids as young as three or four years old, with weapons to protect against the school shootings. What works here is the targets are rooted in reality and addresses some of the pressing concerns of the nation.