R&B and soul artist Rebecca King-Crews talks music, ageism and America’s obsession with youth

Rebecca King-Crews, wife of superstar Terry Crews, says she isn’t looking to necessarily attract a young audience and that her music comes from her heart and personal experiences


                            R&B and soul artist Rebecca King-Crews talks music, ageism and America’s obsession with youth

Rebecca King-Crews, wife of superstar Terry Crews, has kept a relatively low profile in terms of her music. In fact, for years, she released music under the pseudonym ‘Regina Madre’ as she didn’t want the world to have a preconceived notion of who she was and what she could do. However, time's up, and she has finally decided to lift the veil and release music under her own name. 

After years of devoting her life to her family, she says she is now ready and able to commit her life to her music. That said, it’s not always easy coming into the game this late or at her age, as ageism in Hollywood is real and can be a barrier for many. 

MEAWW spoke exclusively with Rebecca who gave us an inside look into her music and the struggles she hopes she won't have to face.

Dead Men Tell No Tales' HOLLYWOOD, CA - MAY 18: Actor Terry Crews (2ndL), Rebecca Crews (R) and family at the Premiere of Disney’s and Jerry Bruckheimer Films’ “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales,” at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, CA with Johnny Depp as the one-and-only Captain Jack in a rollicking new tale of the high seas infused with the elements of fantasy, humor and action that have resulted in an international phenomenon for the past 13 years. May 18, 2017 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Rich Polk/Getty Images for Disney)
Dead Men Tell No Tales' HOLLYWOOD, CA - MAY 18: Actor Terry Crews (2ndL), Rebecca Crews (R) and family at the Premiere of Disney’s and Jerry Bruckheimer Films’ “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales,” at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, CA with Johnny Depp as the one-and-only Captain Jack in a rollicking new tale of the high seas infused with the elements of fantasy, humor and action that have resulted in an international phenomenon for the past 13 years. May 18, 2017 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Rich Polk/Getty Images for Disney)

“I am definitely always concerned about ageism. It’s real and it exists. There are so many things and so many people that have accomplished what someone else said was impossible.  And I think that, in America, there is this worship of youth, but that’s not true worldwide.  Once that door is opened and people say, ‘Wait a minute, there is a market and there is an audience for people of every age’, I think that we can stop limiting what we can do at any point in our life.”

Even though Rebecca may be older than the rest of the new-and-upcoming artists, it truly shouldn’t matter. Is there ever really a “perfect time” to go after what you love and were meant to do? Every person and artist has their time to shine, and some might just be later than others.



 

“I believe that there is never a perfect time because the reality is whatever dream has been placed in your heart, you need to step out and live it and act on it. Now I believe that there is a season for every purpose. In other words, there are people who plug away and plug away and then they succeed at 50. There are people that succeed at 18 and have a run and then you don’t hear from them again.

"So I think that there is a time and a place for everybody’s star to rise. I don’t think that the idea that that’s limited to how many years you have lived on the planet is real and I don’t think that it’s fair. We will do whatever we believe we can do.”

In terms of her music, Rebecca isn’t looking to necessarily attract a young audience. Her music comes from her heart and her personal experiences, which is something that other women her age will relate to the most. Not all art is intended for the younger demographic, nor should it be. What is going to make Rebecca a star is her authenticity and appeal towards a demographic that isn’t often focused on.



 

“My goal in coming out as a singer/songwriter was to target people like me. Because I discovered that there wasn’t a big market for adult music.  I remember thinking, ‘grown folks like music too!’ We like to hear hot new songs, we like to hear great things. We found that the music industry discriminated against people our age and our music. But I thought about all the people I love that aren’t making records anymore and, if they were, I would buy them. And I said, ‘You know what, it’s never too late, I’m just gonna throw my hat in the ring.’  I know that there are fans out there for me, there are people that will relate and identify to not only the style of my music, but to what I have to say that touches their life.”

Rebecca’s music can be found on iTunes, Spotify and YouTube. Check out the link below for the full interview.